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D.C .Ijzbf; 



(MB NO. 102*4018 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Registration Form 

This form is to, use In nominating or requesting determinations of eligibility Y''^^'T^Z' ! TTi^S^ n ^^<<0 

(Form 10-900a). Type all entries. 

1 . Name ot Property 



historic name East Ravp.nauci nd Historic Disrricr: 



other names/site number 



streetThumterRnnghlv houn ^H hv T.awrPnrP Clark Trying P a r>U"°' '^ P ublic ^ 

citv. town Chicago . and Ravpnswood l=J £ 

county Conk 



state Illinois 



code IL 



code 031 



zip code60613 



3. Classification 



Ownership of Property 
PH private 
[X] public-local 
I I public-State 
I I public-Federal 



Category of Property 

I I building(s) 

[XT] district 

I I site 

I I structure 

I I object 



Contributing 
15-38 



Number of Resources within Property 
Noncontributing 

136 buildings 

sites 

structures 

objects 

136 Total 



1538 



Name of related multiple property listing: 

N/A 



Number of contributing resources previously 
listed in the National Register 1 



4. State/Federal Agency Certification 



As the designated authority under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended, I hereby certify that this 
SI nomination □ request for determination of eligibility meets the documentation standards for registering properties in the 
National Register of Historic Places and meets the procedural and professional requirements set forth in 36 CFR Part 60. 
In my opinion, the property [2! meets Ddoes not meet the National Register criteria. Usee continuation sheet. 



Signature of certifying official 



Date 



/KeSStf AT**'* rfC^^/ck- 



State or Federal agency and bureau 



In my opinion, the property □ meets Ddoes not meet the National Register criteria. Dsee continuation sheet. 



Signature of commenting or other official 



State or Federal agency and bureau 



5. National Park Service Certification 

I, hereby, certify that this property is: 
D entered in the National Register. 
| | See continuation sheet. 

□ determined eligible for the National 
Register. D See continuation sheet. 

1 I determined not eligible for the 
National Register. 

j 1 removed from the National Register. 

□ other, (explain:) 



Signature of the Keeper 



Date of Action 



6. Function or Use 

Historic Functions (enter categories from instructions) 

Domestic/single dwelling 

Domestic/multiple dwelling 

t- 1 _j / n«.if n^filVTnfT Fflf 1 



Liomesixc/ mm u-i-M J-^ ^w^^-*-*-^ 

Industry/manufacturing f acility 
Commerce/ specia lty store 



Current Functions (enter categories from instructions) 

Domestic/ single dwelling 

Domestic/multiple dwelling 
Indus try /manufacturing facility 
Commerce/ specialty store 



7. Description 



Architectural Classification 

(enter categories from instructions) 

Queen Anne 

Neo-classical Revival 
Bungalow/Craftsman 



Materials (enter categories from instructions) 

foundation Limestone 

wa ii s Brick 

Wea therboard 

roof 



Asphalt" 



Stone 



Terra cotta 



Describe present and historic physical appearance. 
See continuation sheets 



ET1 See continuation sheet 



Qua AHmwl NO. 103*4011 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number _^__ Page _J East Ravenswood Historic District 



SUMMARY 

Th° East Ravenswood Historic District occupies a site six miles 
north of the Chicago Loop and about a mile west of Lake Michigan. 
The north side of Chicago is geologically an old lake bottom, which 
explains its extreme flatness. Two sandy spits rise slightly from 
this surface - Rosehill spit and Graceland spit, both names of two 
historic cemeteries that chose the sandy, relatively high terrain 
for burial grounds. Just west of Graceland spit the land grew into 
evergreen forests, which made it perfect for suburban development. 
Further east and south, the flat, treeless land lent itself to the 
rapidly burgeoning growth of the metropolis. The site upon which 
Ravenswood grew was called Cedar Lawn because of the evergreen 
woods. The district is primarily residential in nature, with 
corridors of commerce and industry along major transportation 
routes. Institutions such as schools and churches are 
interspersed. Buildings of two and three stories, many on raised 
basements, oredominate. The buildings generally date from 1880 to 
1 929, and are divided between frame and masonry. The single family 
homes tend to be frame, while the multi-family buildings, most or 
which are later, are of brick. The architectural styles are 
extremely diverse, reflecting the type of building, socio-economic 
factors, development pressures and prevailing architectural tastes. 
There are many fine examples of stylistic transitions from farm 
house vernacular, picturesque, classical revival and eclectic, to 
modern design such as Prairie School. Residential building types 
range from cottages and two flats to large sprawling homes and 
large apartment buildings. The relationship of buildings to their 
sites and lot lines varies considerably, but setbacks tend to be 
fairly uniform for a given area, ranging from 15 to 25 feet. 



BOUNDARIES 

Identifying the boundaries of the East Ravenswood Historic District 
began with an analysis of the historic boundaries as defined by_ Oie 
early subdivisions, and the continuing community perceived 
boundaries, which were a result of community identification and 
development as recorded in newspapers. Secondly, an analysis Oi 
the significance and historic themes of the neighborhood provided 
a base from which to compare and contrast the visual study of the 
building stock to determine what remains today that manifests the 
community's history. Thirdly, an overall review of the integrity, 



HP8 Form 1W0O* OUB Aptm* Wft 10H40H 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number L Page L East Ravenswood Historic District 

condition and visual cohesion of the remaining cultural resources 
determined the final boundaries. 

The original Ravenswood subdivision of 1868 consisted of 194 acres 
bounded roughly by present day Lawrence on the north, Montrose on 
the south, Clark on the east and Damen on the west. Subsequent 
additions to the subdivision through 1890, which brought it to 360 
acres, extended the boundaries to Berteau on the south and Leavitt 
on the west, while retaining the Lawrence and Clark boundaries. 
Newspaper accounts were reviewed for later reports of Ravenswood 
boundaries. There were several reports of Ravenswood "s retail area 
on Irving Park and in 1929 the boundaries were reported as Winnemao 
on the north, Irving Park on the south, Clark on the east and 
Lincoln on the west. Clearly, the perceived neighborhood of 
Ravenswood had expanded. In 1958 it was reported as Lawrence 
Irving Park, Clark and Ravenswood. By 1979, the North Side Real 
Estate Board's Ravenswood Community Guide gave the boundaries as 
Bryn Mawr, Irving Park, Clark and the Chicago River. The eastern 
portion of the area currently and popularly known as Ravenswood 
comprises most of the original Ravenswood development. A portion 
of it to the west of Ravenswood Avenue has lost integrity c.ue 
mostly to the infringement of Ravenswood Hospital. For this 
reason, the district is most clearly identified as East Ravenswooa. 

From the historic background as discussed in Section 8, related 
areas of the district were identified. Mam transportation 
corridors are Clark Street, an early historic road that is 
primarily commercial from Lawrence south to Montrose and borders 
Graceland Cemetery from Montrose south to Irving Park; Irving Park, 
which is also commercial historically and has served as a retail 
area to Ravenswood; Lincoln Avenue, of mixed commercial nature and 
Lawrence, a commercial street that begins to tie in to the Uptown 
community. Within these boundaries, Montrose, also primarily a 
business street, bisects the north and south areas of the district. 
Thl Chicago and Northwest Railroad tracks, parallel to Ravenswood 
Avenue, provide both the most historically important transportation 
corridor and the industrial area linked to it. Dispersed around 
the transportation corridors, light industry and business center 
are the residential areas, with both early 50 x 156 lots and 
subsequent subdivisions of those lots into 25- segments In the 
residential areas are the early elegant single family homes and 
cottaqes, and the two-flats and multi-family dwellings dating from 
the turn-of-the-century. While very few pubs and bars are to be 
found in Ravenswood, there is, on practically every block, a school 
or church signifying the importance of these institutions to the 
community . 



UK F<™ ttnan ow Appro* •» IOTWOT« 

(MS) 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 7 Page 4 . „ . 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



The historical and visual review of the total area indicates a 
solid boundary on Clark Street on the east, where it abuts the 
Sheridan Park Historic District between Lawrence and Montrose, and 
the Graceland Cemetery from Montrose south to Irving Park. On the 
south, Irving Park is also a historical and visual boundary of 
businesses bordering the residential streets to the north. On the 
north border, Lawrence seems a natural boundary since north of it, 
visual cohesion is lost as new development has encroached and 
building lots and setbacks are different. 

West of the industrial corridor of Ravenswood Avenue, there is no 
clear line of demarcation. While visual inspection reveals a high 
degree of integrity in buildings to the east of Ravenswood, the 
areas to the west are spotty, and have been subject to post World 
War II development. For this reason, East Ravenswood was chosen 
as the western boundary. Since the industrial corridor was 
considered a crucial historic theme, the most intact portion - East 
Ravenswood from Montrose south to Irving Park - was included in 
the district. From Montrose north, the industrial corridor has 
lost sufficient integrity, so the boundary proceeds behind those 
buildings. In all areas, visual cohesion and integrity were 
reviewed while keeping in mind the representation of extant 
buildings of all economic levels that are good examples of their 
type and historic link. 

STREETSCAPES , MATERIALS & SCALE 

The North-South streets of Ravenswood are a continuation of the 
existing Chicago grid, as they proceed north from Lakeview. Clark 
Street departs from this grid, as it is a prehistoric trail 
following the sandy ridge of Graceland spit slightly to the 
northwest. Many of the east-west streets carry the names, or did 
oriqinally, of the owners of the Ravenswood Land Company. For 
instance, Wilson Avenue was named for John M. Wilson, President of 
the company and Lei and Avenue for Cyrus Leland. 

There are three street widths in the district, the most common 
being 75'. The two wider streets are Irving Park as a ma^or east- 
west thoroughfare, and Ashland as north-south, which are 100" wide. 
To the east of Ashland, however, are found narrower east-west 
streets, including Irving Park which narrows to 60'. All of the 



OMfi Afjpnrt* No. 1O2*-O01S 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number __Z_ Page 5 _,,,.,. • „• * • * 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



shorter east-west streets are 60' east of Ashland and south of 
Montrose, which reflects a later addition to the original plat. 
The original lot sizes, on 75' streets were 50' X 156' with 
setbacks of about 35'. As the subdivision grew, many lots were 
divided into 25' widths, and a 25' setback became the norm. This 
setback still holds for much of the district, and is fairly uniform 
along Paulina and Hermitage. Ashland, due to the widening of the 
street, now has setbacks of only about 10'. Changes in the zoning 
ordinance in 1923 allowed for closer proximity of residential 
buildings so the setbacks of later apartment buildings m the 
district are almost nothing. Along Ravenswood Avenue, industries 
had to observe zoning restrictions to preserve the scale of the 
community by setting back buildings, but these setbacks^ have 
disappeared as Ravenswood Avenue was widened and the railroad 
tracks raised in about 1910. 

The scale of the district is very homogenous, as there are 
virtually no high rise buildings, and only a few over three stories 
on a raised basement. These include a few four story apartment 
buildings and the Deagan building on Ravenswood Avenue with five 
stories on a raised basement, plus a tower. Commercial buildings 
tend to be one or two floors, or retail ground floor with two 
floors of apartments above. Single family homes set the scale for 
building size in the district since the 1880 's, with institutional 
buildings such as churches and schools being somewhat larger, but 
still fitting in. Imposing church towers have always been a 
welcome sight in the community. The similar building sizes have 
tended to lend a harmonious nature to the district despite 
stylistic and building type diversity. 

The materials found in the district are typical of their time 
period and location. The larger single family homes and the 
cottages are of frame construction, often with turned or otherwise 
decorative woodwork - 2 , 4 or 6 flats and larger apartment 
buildings, are built mostly of brick, with some stone. Since many 
of these were built from 1910 through the 1920 's, there are many 
types of decorative and variegated brick represented. The older 
areas of the city of Chicago tended to be built with the standard 
red brick from the brick yards along the Chicago River. As those 
quarries were depleted round the turn of the century, brick making 
became popular, along with gold, orange and mottled colors, with 
many different textures. Examples of all of these can be found m 
Ravenswood. Foundations are generally stone, in different types 



QMS Apfitwl No. 10M40M 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 7 Page 6 

East Ravenswood Historic District 

of limestone. Limestone was also used prolifically for contrasting 
trim lintels, sills and belt courses, as well as more decorative 
trim. With the proximity of Northwest Terra Cotta Company along 
the river on the north side of Chicago, terra cotta became quite 
popular for embellishment, often hard to distinguish from stone. 
It was, at the time, less expensive to manufacture and could be 
used to create wildly fantastic designs. 

RTTTT.nTNG STOCK 

The district is laid out primarily as a rectangle with the long 
side on the north-south axis, with four major streets - Greenview 
Ashland, Paulina and Hermitage. They form long "ocks bisected by 
alleys, so that most buildings face outward onto these streets. 
The East-West commercial streets offer some exception to .this 
Irving Park, Montrose and Lawrence. These streets emphasize the 
sides of buildings and between block buildings that face north and 
south. Southeast of Montrose and Greenview where _ Clark Stree. 
flares off to the southeast, long east-west residential blocks are 
formed, perpendicular to the north-south blocks west of Greenview 
These blocks represent some of the most homogenous areas of .he 
district, comprised of single family homes and small multi-family 
buildings only, with often most of a particular street having been 
built within a decade. 

The various types of residential structures are dispersed through- 
out the district fairly evenly. While there are more single family 
homes than any other type, about 30% of the residential buildings 
are two, four and six flats, obviously built for speculation during 
the time following the introduction of the elevated tram into 
Ravenswood when it was growing rapidly. These small multi-family 
buildings were built from 1905-1920, of stone or brick. Many two 
flats were built from 1907-1910 in pairs. They are »«ror images 
of each other, each with a bay. The four and six f lets are the 
same type of building, only joined together. They all tend to have 
refined classical revival entrances and detailing. After 1910 bay 
windows become sun porches, the smooth stone or *" c) c becomes 
variegated, and the building forms become simpler and squared off, 
losing extra bays and irregular shapes. 

The homogenous scale of the district was helped by the z °ning "de 
of 1923, which required fireproof construction for buildings of 



(MB Aflpiwl No. 102*4019 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number 7 Page . 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



four or more stories. So most buildings, even the, larger apartment 
Gildings, continued to build with th«e Towefer ,° "ta^onl 

pafSllsiifillii 

nineteen courtyard apartment buildings ir .the ^^^^^ 
street ^f^ ut th^ same nu^er^ condor apartment 
buddings, vMch tend to feature the most ornate decoration. 

in 1925 Sears Roebuck and Company located on La "J^ ^ e ™ e ' s ^? 
scattered commercial establishments an I served to ^"^J*^ 
for commercial use. It provided an impetus f £ *urt^ r se . 

brick, deco ornament and often terra cotta embellishment. 

CONDITION. TNTEGFTTY AND INTRUS IONS 

.,„+. <-j4- no rt "The Beautiful Country Near Chicago" 
^l^h°ed\rth" et Chic t ag:^nT Northwestern Railroad described 

Ravenswood thus : 

"Ravenswood is a very desireable ^ff^J^^ 
now within the northern limits of Chicago. The 
improvements include all that are P°f*£***}** 
modern city. The streets are broad and beautifully 
*=*la and the oretty residences are surrounded by 
|pac?ous ifwns? fleers and shrubbery. The splendid 
schools are the outgrowth of early and complete 
g There are many churches and numerous 
societies and clubs. In the business district 
scores of every variety afford convenient marketing. 



NPS fom IMO)4 OMB Aflf*w* No. 102*001* 

IMS] 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 7 Page 8 

East Ravenswood Historic District 

An elevated track system, reducing the running time 
of all Chicago and Northwestern trains gives to 
Ravenswood unsurpassed service, the six-mile 
distance being quickly annihilated." 

The institutional buildings in the district are historically on 
corners, and remain so today. The architecture of these churches 
and schools varies with the construction dates, and while the 
schools are exclusively brick, the churches range from frame and 
stucco to brick and stone. Most of the churches have attached 
rectories which even when built at a later time, blend in 
sympathetically to the style and period of the church. Additions 
to the schools are in keeping with scale, materials and design 
also. 

The district's industrial buildings are all located on Ravenswood, 
along the east side of the railroad tracks from Montrose south to 
Irving Park Road. They are all brick, built in the early twentieth 
century. Stylistically, they are simple but display the excellent 
brick work of Chicago's north side masons. They are also 
embellished with stone and terra cotta, similar designs to those 
on commercial and apartment buildings of the time. 

This description still suits Ravenswood to a large degree today. 
The setting is still very much the same, even though about one- 
third of the single family homes were replaced with multi-family 
buildings between 1900 and 1930. The scale of the buildings has 
been retained however, though more were built of masonry in this 
period, replacing frame homes. 

As early as 1958, Ravenswood was designated as a conservation area 
by the city, which made landowners eligible for federal loans for 
rehabilitation and renovation of properties and new construction. 
It was a move by the community to prevent deterioration like that 
of other north side communities. Fortunately, no demolition was 
undertaken by this program, although many of the renovation 
projects were not of a historic quality. The siding on many of the 
frame houses was added during this time. Also, porches were 
repaired and often altered, and in some cases windows were changed. 
Occasionally, enlargements were made. There were more of these 
changes made to the frame single family homes than to multi-family 
structures and larger apartment buildings. 



NP8 Form 1&40&4 OUB Appro.* No. T034O01S 

(Me) 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 7 Pann 9 . „. 

_ East Ravenswood Historic District 

The general condition of the buildings in the district is very 
good. While some building trim and a few cornices have been lost, 
there are few buildings in a state of deterioration. Many could 
use repointing of masonry or repainting, however. Due to the 
continued stability of the neighborhood, there are almost no 
vacancies. Ravenswood never experienced the chaotic changes and 
deterioration of other areas along the lake - it has remained 
essentially a stable middle class neighborhood. A reporter writing 
in November of 1986 said that "Ravenswood is a neighborhood that 
has preserved its past while building a future." That future is 
including a lot of present day rehabilitation, most of which 
involves removal of synthetic siding and replacement of historic 
materials and trim, thereby returning greater integrity to the 
district. 

Community revitalization of Ravenswood has also led to recent new 
infill construction. Fortunately, this construction has been in 
the form of town homes, mostly frame construction, that fit into 
the scale and setting of the district. In a few instances, such 
as 4611 and 4615 North Hermitage, these homes are stylistically 
difficult to discern from their "original" neighbors. There are 
no intrusive buildings in the district that compromise the size, 
scale, materials or setting of Ravenswood. The apartment buildings 
constructed between 1960 - 1975 are fairly evenly distributed 
throughout the district, while not stylistically in keeping, are 
not high rises and are confined to about 12 units as the largest. 

There is one large recent development of townhomes that, while the 
individual buildings are sympathetic, is intrusive in its entirety. 
This development was built on vacant land on the east side of 
Wilson Avenue between Hermitage and Paulina, and takes up about 
half a block. It consists of 18 separate 3 story townhomes, built 
of frame construction with "Prairie" style trim. Buried in the 
middle of the district, these and other newer buildings do not 
compromise the level of integrity that exists for this highly 
distinct and historic neighborhood as a whole. 

Judgements of integrity were made based on visual inspection, with 
assistance from the 1983-84 survey by the Commission on Chicago 
Landmarks. Contributing resources are significant to the district 
because they possess historic integrity and reflect the character 
of the district during its period of significance. Non- 
contributing resources either lack the architectural integrity 



OWS Approval No. 1034401t 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 7 Page 10 .... 

_ East Ravenswood Historic District 

necessary to convey the ambiance of the period of significance, or 
were constructed after the period of significance of the district. 

There are 1726 buildings within the district, including 650 
garages. of the total 1726 buildings, there are 136 non- 
contributing buildings including 37 garages. The total number of 
contributing buildings is 1590 with a total of 977 contributing 
non-garage buildings. 

Sixty-one percent of the non-contributing buildings were built 
after 1940. Others have lost their integrity through the addition 
of synthetic siding that has changed the character of the building, 
through structural and window changes and/or obtrusive additions. 
Some of the non-contributing buildings could potentially be 
contributing by the removal of inappropriate siding and the return 
of characteristic details. 

In the following section, all buildings in the district are listed 
by address. The date given is for the main building at the 
address, with the garages listed by number only. The main building 
is always counted in the contributing or - non-contributing list, 
which shows that total number of contributing and non-contributing 
buildings for each address. 



One property, 4532-58 North Clark Street, is currently listed in the 
National Register of Historic Places as a contributing building in 
the Sheridan Park Historic District. 



NPSFonn 104004 



OuaAppmw/NO. 10344019 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



11 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



BUILDING LIST 



STREET 


ADDRESS 


DATE 


GARAGE 


CONTRIBUTING 


ASHLAND 


4001-43 




1915 




1 




4010-12 




1927 




1 




4014 




1908 


1 


2 




4016 




1908 


1 


2 




4020-22 




1914 


1 


2 




4024-26 




1926 




1 




4030 




1902 


1 


2 




4032 




1902 


1 


2 




4034-40 




1925 




1 




4046 


Ca 


1965 








4047-59 


19 


38/1938 




1 




4107-11 




1921 


1 


2 




4106 


Ca 


1890 


1 


2 




4110-12 




1912 


1 


2 




4113 




1910 


1 


2 




4118-20 




1920 


1 


2 




4119 




1908 




1 




4122 




1915 


1 


2 




4123 




1895 


1 


.2 




4124 




1897 


1 


2 




4125-27 


Ca 


1890 


2 


2 




4128 




1898 


1 


2 




4133 






1 






4130-36 




1911 


2 


3 




4137-39 




1922 


1 


1 




4141 




1925 


1 


2 




4142 






1 


1 




4143 


Ca 


1900 


1 


2 




4144-48 




1902 


2 


3 




4145-49 




1906 


2 


3 




4151 




1915 


1 


2 




4152 




1903 


1 


2 




4157 




1908 




1 




4159 




1908 


1 


2 




4200-06 




1927 




1 




4201-07 


Ca 


1915 




1 




4209 




1923 


1 


2 



NON-CONTRIBUTING 



Mo. 102440M 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page . 



12 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



ASHLAND (cont.) 










4212 




Ca 


1905 


1 


4213 






1906 


1 


4214 






1905 


1 


4216 






1905 


1 


4217 






1906 


1 


4219 






1903 


1 


4220- 


22 




1929 




4223 






1915 


1 


4224 




Ca 


1965 




4227 






1906 


1 


4229 






1915 


1 


4230 






1916 


1 


4232 






1915 


1 


4233 




Ca 


1965 




4236 






1907 


■1 


4237 






1915 


1 


4240 




Ca 


1905 


1 


4239 






1915 


1 


4242 






1899 




4244 




Ca 


1900 


1 


4245 




Ca 


1915 


1 


4246 








1 


4247- 


59 




1916 




4300- 


04 




1924 




4309 






1925 


1 


4308- 


12 




1923 




4311 




Ca 


1905 


1 


4313 






1907 


1 


4314 






1905 


1 


4316 






1905 


1 


4317 




Ca 


1910 


1 


4319 






1909 


1 


4321 






1909 


1 


4322 






1896 




4324 








1 


4327 










4326 








1 


4329 






1916 


1 


4331- 


-33 




1915 


1 


4332 






1909 


1 



GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 

2 
2 
2 



OMB Appro** Mo. 10244X111 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page 



13 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING - NON -CONTRIBUTING 



ASHLAND (cont.) 








4334-42 


1896 


4 


5 


4335 


1894 


1 


2 


4339 


Ca 1900 


1 


2 


4341 


Ca 1915 


1 


2 


4343 


Ca 1915 


1 


2 


4346 


1895 


1 


2 


4348-52 


Ca 1920 




1 


4349-57 


Ca 1920 




1 


4400-12 


1917 




1 


4405 


Ca 1905 


1 


2 


4409 


Ca 1905 


1 


2 


4411 


1903 


1 


2 


4415 


1903 


1 


2 


4417 


1925 


1 


2 


4420-22 


1921 


1 


2 


4423 


Ca 1970 






4425-27 


1925 




1 


4428-38 


1924 




1 


4437 


Ca 1900 


1 


1 


4440-48 


1925 




1 


4443 


1897 


1 


2 


4447 


Ca 1900 


1 


2 


4450-52 


1914 


1 


2 


4451-57 


1913 


1 


2 


4500-06 


1927 




1 


4501-03 


1901 




1 


4509 


Ca 1900 




1 


4510-18 


1924 




1 


4513 


Ca 1900 


1 


2 


4515-17 


1909 


1 


2 


4519-21 


1909 


1 


2 


4522 


1901 




1 


4526 


1900 


1 


2 


4525-27 


1897 


1 


2 


4531-33 


1923 




1 


4532 


1895 


1 


2 


4534 


Ca 1895 


1 


2 


4535 


1899 


1 


2 


4537 


1899 


1 


2 


4538 


Ca 1895 




1 



NPSForm 1W0O-* 



OM0 Approval No. 1034-0019 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



14 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON- CONTRIBUTING 



ASHLAND (cont.) 












4541 






1906 






4542 










1 


4543 






1906 


1 


2 


4544- 


50 


Ca 


1920 




1 


4547 






1906 


1 


2 


4551 






1902 




1 


4600- 


06 




1924 




1 


4601- 


13 








1 


4610 








1 




4615- 


27 




1927 




1 


4616 






1961 






4622 






1895 


2 


3 


4624- 


26 




1922 


1 


2 


4631- 


33 










4630- 


32 




1925 




1 


4641- 


43 




1905 




1 


4700- 


06 


Ca 


1970 






4710 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4714 






1907 


1 


2 


4716 






1907 




1 


4720 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4724 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4728 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4732 




Ca 


1890 


1 




4734 




Ca 


1920 


1 


2 


4738 






1904 


1 


2 


4740 






1903 


1 


2 


4742 






1903 


1 


2 


4746 






1903 


1 


2 


4748 






1903 


1 


2 


4752 






1903 


1 


2 


4754 






1903 


1 


2 


4758 




Ca 


1903 




1 


BELLE PLAINE 












1400- 


-02 




1898 




1 


1407- 


-09 




1910 


1 


2 


1408 






1907 


1 


2 


1410 






1910 


1 


2 



NPSFoti 1M0IH 



(MB AfifiiMt No. JOMOOJI 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



15 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



BELLE 


PLAINE (cont.) 












1411 






1909 


1 


2 




1412 






1910 


1 


2 




1413 






1909 


1 


2 




1415- 


17 


Ca 


1912 




1 




1414- 


18 




1900 


1 


2 




1419 






1899 


1 


2 




1420- 


22 




1898 


1 


2 




1423 






1898 


1 


2 




1426 






1922 




1 




1427 






1895 


1 


2 




1430 






1923 




1 




1433 




Ca 


1895 


2 


3 




1434 






1905 


1 


2 




1437- 


39 




1962 








1438 






1925 




2 




1442 






1895 


1 


2 




1443- 


45 




1903 


2 


3 




1446 






1894 


1 


2 




1447- 


49 




1919 


1 


2 




1450 




Ca 


1910 


1 


2 




1451- 


53 


Ca 


1900 


1 


2 




1452 










1 




1454 






1908 


1 


2 




1455 






1900 


1 


2 




1457 






1900 


1 


2 




1458 






1922 


1 


2 




1459- 


-61 


Ca 


1915 


1 


2 




1460 






1893 


1 


2 




1468 




Ca 


1895 




1 




1472 




Ca 


1895 




1 




1476 




Ca 


1895 




1 




1518- 


-26 




1929 




1 




1600- 


-08 




1902 


1 


2 




1601 






1901 




1 




1603 






1901 




1 




1607 






1901 




1 




1609 






1901 




1 




1613 






1901 




1 




1615 






1901 




1 




1618 


-20 


Ca 


1912 




1 



OUB Aft**** No. 102*4011 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



16 



East Ravenswood Historic District 







DATE 


GARAGE 


CONTRIBUTING 


BELLE PLAINE (cont.) 










1619- 


25 


Ca 


1980 






1627- 


35 


Ca 


1980 






1700- 


10 




1954 


1 




1711- 


13 


Ca 


1924 




1 


1715 




Ca 


1890 


1 


2 


1718- 


24 


Ca 


1960 






1725 






1906 


1 


2 


1746- 


56 








1 


1755- 


57 


Ca 


1909 




1 


BERTEAU 14 04- 


06 




1915 




1 


1409 






1896 




1 


1410 






1912 




1 


1411 






1896 


1 


2 


1412 






1920 


1 


2 


1413 






1896 


1 


2 


1415 






1898 


1 


2 


1416 






1902 


1 


2 


1417 






1906 


1 


2 


1419 






1920 


1 


2 


1420 






1916 


1 


2 


1422 






1911 


1 


2 


1423- 


-25 




1895 


1 


2 


1424 




Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


1427 






1896 


1 


2 


1428 






1908 




1 


1431 






1896 


1 


2 


1432 






1906 


1 


2 


1433 












1436 






1897 


1 


2 


1437 




Ca 


1915 


1 


2 


1438 






1910 




1 


1441 




Ca 


1920 




1 


1442 




Ca 


1900 




1 


1443 




Ca 


1908 




1 


1445 




Ca 


1908 


1 


2 


1446 






1920 


1 


2 


1447 




Ca 


1910 


1 


2 


1449 




Ca 


1910 




1 



NON-CONTRIBUTING 

1 
1 
2 



MPS Form 104004 



OMS */*»*** Mo. 102*4)011 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



17 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING -NON ^CONTRIBUTING 



BERTEAU (cont.) 










1453 


Ca 


1910 


1 


2 


1454 




1898 


1 


2 


1452 


Ca 


1910 


1 


2 


1456-58 




1923 


1 


2 


1457 


Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


1459 


Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


1515 








1 


1516-28 


Ca 


1920 


1 


2 


1519 


Ca 


1910 


1 


2 


1601-15 




1908 




1 


1604-06 




1920 




1 


1612 




1905 




1 


1614 




1905 




1 


1621 


Ca 


1900 




1 


1620-34 


Ca 


1965 






1718-30 




1949 






1721 




1894 


1 


2 


1725 




1895 




1 


1729 




1895 




1 


1751-59 


Ca 


1920 




1 


1750-56 


Ca 


1920 


1 


2 


1762-74 




1910 




1 


CLARK 414 2 








1 


4144 








1 


4146-54 








1 


4200-08 




1915 




1 


4220-26 




1937 




1 


4300-08 




1926 




1 


4338-40 


Ca 


1925 




1 


4400-04 




1905 




1 


4410-12 




1913 






4414 




1914 


1 


2 


4416 




1921 




1 


4418-20 


Ca 


1922 




1 


4424-28 


Ca 


1925 




1 


4430-38 


Ca 


1928 




1 


4440-48 


Ca 


1930 




1 


4500-06 




1922 




1 



NP8 Forni IHOft* 



QMS *fifKWWl HO. 102*^)018 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



18 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



CLARK 


cont.) 

4512- 


30 




DATE 


GARAGE 


CONTRIBUl 


ING 














4532- 


58 




1922 




1 




CULLOM 


1423- 


25 




1926 




1 






1424- 


26 


Ca 


1925 




1 






1429 






1929 


1 


2 






1432 






1902 


1 


2 






1434 






1902 


1 


2 






1435 






1916 


1 


2 






1437 






1916 




1 






1438 






1902 


1 


2 






1440 






1902 




1 






1441 






1909 


1 


2 






1442 






1924 


1 


2 






1444 






1908 


1 


2 






1445 






1904 




1 






1448 






1901 




1 






1449 






1909 


1 


2 






1450 






1901 




1 






1452 






1909 


1 


2 






1453 




Ca 


1905 


1 


2 






1455 




Ca 


1905 


1 


2 






1456 






1908 


1 


2 






1459 






1904 


1 


2 






1460 






1895 


1 


2 






1461 






1909 


1 


2 






1462 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 






1464 






1914 


1 


2 






1465 




Ca 


1915 




1 






1468 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 






1500- 


-10 




1916 




1 






1501- 


-15 




1961 










1518 




Ca 


1910 


1 


2 






1511- 


-25 


Ca 


1920 


1 


2 






1522 




Ca 


1905 




1 






1526 




Ca 


1905 




1 






1528- 


-32 




1939 




1 






1601 






1897 




1 






1602- 


-10 


Ca 


1920 




1 





OMfl ApprpvW No. 1024-0070 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



19 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



CULLOM (cont.) 












1605 






1897 




1 


1609 






1897 




1 


1611 






1897 


1 


2 


1614- 


16 




1894 




1 


1615 






1897 


1 


2 


1620- 


30 


Ca 


1920 




1 


1635 












1751 




Ca 


1890 




1 


1758 




1914/49 


1 


2 


1762 






1906 




1 


1763 






1895 




1 


1764 










1 


1765 






1897 




1 


1767 






1895 




1 


1771 












1773 






1897 




1 


1775 






1897 




1 


1770- 


76 


Ca 


1920 




1 


CUYLER 14 02- 


02 


Ca 


1925 




1 


1401- 


03 




1911 




1 


1408 






1895 




1 


1409 






1895 




1 


1412 




Ca 


1955 






1413 






1901 




1 


1415- 


-17 




1915 




2 


1416 




Ca 


1928 




1 


1420 






1903 




1 


1421 






1918 




1 


1423 






1921 




1 


1424 






1924 


1 


2 


1425- 


-27 




1926 


1 


2 


1428 






1924 


1 


2 


1430 




Ca 


1915 




1 


1431- 


-33 




1897 


1 


2 


1434- 


-36 




1899 


1 


2 


1435 




Ca 


.1900 




1 


1437 




Ca 


1900 




1 


1440 






1897 


1 


2 



OUB Afipnvwl NO. J024O0M 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



20 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE 



GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



CUYLER (cont.) 










1441-43 




1908 


1 


2 


1442 




1897 




1 


1444 


Ca 


1920 




1 


1445 


Ca 


1910 


1 


2 


1446 


Ca 


1920 


1 


2 


1447 




1894 




1 


1451 


Ca 


1920 


1 


2 


1452 




1921 


1 


2 


1454 




1897 


1 


2 


1455-57 




1901 


1 


2 


1456 




1897 




1 


1458 




1909 




1 


1460 




1909 




1 


1461 


Ca 


1955 






1463 




1893 


1 


2 


1467-69 




1897 




1 


1470 


Ca 


1920 




1 


GREENVIEW 4000-56 




1906 




1 


4001-03 




1901 




1 


4007 




1900 


1 


2 


4009 


Ca 


1900 




1 


4013 




1894 


1 


2 


4019 




1897 


1 


2 


4023-25 




1897 




1 


4035-37 




1921 




1 


4039 




1897 


1 


2 


4043 




1924 


1 


2 


4045 




1918 


1 


2 


4049-53 




1924 


2 


3 


4055-59 




1895 


1 


2 


4100-06 




1945 






4107-09 






1 


2 


4108 




1897 




1 


4112 




1897 


1 


2 


4113-15 




1925 


1 


2 


4116 




1911 


1 


2 


4117 






1 


2 


4122 






1 


2 



No. 102*4C1t 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



21 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



GREENVIEW (cont.) 












4125 








2 


3 


4126 






1894 


2 


3 


4130- 


32 




1899 


1 


2 


4135- 


37 




1897 




1 


4136 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4141- 


43 




1909 


1 


2 


4142 




Ca 


1900 




1 


4144 






1901 


1 


2 


4145- 


47 




1914 


1 


2 


4148 






1901 


1 


2 


4151- 


53 




1895 


1 


2 


4152 






1895 


1 


2 


4155 






1895 




1 


4158 






1905 


1 


2 


4200 




Ca 


1895 


1 


2 


4201 






1912 


1 


2 


4204 






1895 


1 


2 


4207 








1 


2 


4210 






1916 


1 


2 


4211 








1 


1 


4216 






1897 


1 


2 


4217 








1 


2 


4222 








1 


2 


4223 






1925 




1 


4226 






1901 


1 


2 


4230 






1913 


1 


2 


4232 






1913 


1 


2 


4235 








1 


2 


4236 






1911 




1 


4237 




Ca 


1915 


1 


2 


4240 






1911 


1 


2 


4243 






1912 


1 


2 


4244 






1911 




1 


4245 






1912 


1 


2 


4248 






1940 


1 


2 


4249 




Ca 


1915 


1 


2 


4255 




Ca 


1950 






4257- 


-59 


Ca 


1950 






4301 




Ca 


1970 


1 




4305 






1901 


1 


2 



No. I02*OOM 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



22 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



GREENVIEW (cont.) 












4307 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4308 






1909 


1 


2 


4309 






1901 


1 


2 


4310 








1 


2 


4311 






1901 


1 


2 


4312 






1902 


1 


2 


4315 








1 


2 


4316 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4318 






1902 


1 


2 


4319 






1903 


1 


2 


4320 






1901 


1 


2 


4321 






1903 


1 


2 


4322 






1901 


1 


2 


4325 






1906 


1 


2 


4326 






1901 


1 


2 


4328 






1896 


1 


2 


4330 




Ca 


1900 




1 


4333 






1901 


1 


2 


4334 








1 


2 


4335 






1902 


1 


2 


4338 






1896 


1 


2 


4339 






1902 


1 


2 


4340 






1896 




1 


4341 






1902 


1 


2 


4343 






1901 


1 


2 


4345 






1901 


1 


2 


4346 






1896 


1 


2 


4351- 


53 




1925 


1 


2 


4400 










1 


4404 






1906 




1 


4406 






1906 




1 


4410- 


12 




1916 


1 


2 


4407- 


15 


Ca 


1925 




1 


4416 




Ca 


1970 






4417 






1899 


1 


2 


4421 




Ca 


1989 






4420- 


22 




1915 




1 


4423 




Ca 


1989 






4424 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4426 






1897 


1 


2 



Ma 1024-001$ 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



23 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE 



GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



GREENVIEW (cont.) 












4427 


Ca 


1989 






1 


4429 


Ca 


1989 






1 


4430 




1898 


1 


2 




4431-33 




1898 


2 


3 




4432 


Ca 


1900 


1 


2 




4434 




1901 


1 


2 




4435-43 




1925 




1 




4438 


Ca 


1920 




1 




4445 




1897 




1 




4447 




1897 


1 


2 




4452 






1 


2 




4501-09 




1924 




1 




4510-12 




1904 


1 


1 


1 


4511 




1908 


1 


2 




4513 




1906 


1 


1 


1 


4514-16 




1910 


1 


1 


1 


4517 




1903 


1 


2 




4518-22 




1925 




1 




4521 




1901 


1 




2 


4523 




1897 


1 




2 


4525-29 




1924 




1 




4526 




1901 


1 


2 




4530 




1898 


1 


2 




4531-33 




1901 


1 


2 




4534-36 




1906 


1 


2 




4532 




1898 


1 


2 




4537 




1903 


1 


2 




4541 






1 


1 


1 


4542 




1899 


1 


2 




4543 




1901 


1 


2 




4545 




1896 


1 




2 


4546 




1899 


1 


2 




4547 






1 


2 




HERMITAGE 4000-02 




1904 




1 




4004 




1902 




1 




4008 




1902 




1 




4010-12 




1897 


1 


2 




4015 




1896 


1 


2 





OMB Appro"* Ho. 1034-0011 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



24 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



HERMITAGE (cont.) 












4016- 


18 




1897 


1 


2 


4019 






1901 


1 


2 


4020 






1899 


1 


2 


4021 






1903 


1 


2 


4022 






1899 




1 


4025 






1903 


1 


2 


4026 






1924 




1 


4028 






1900 




1 


4029 






1903 


1 


2 


4031 






1901 


1 


2 


4032 




Ca 


1905 




1 


4035 




Ca 


1901 


1 


2 


4037 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4040- 


48 




1916 




1 


4041 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4043- 


45 




1912 


1 


2 


4047 






1913 


1 


2 


4050 






1894 




1 


4051 








1 


2 


4054- 


56 




1901 




1 


4055- 


57 




1911 




1 


4103 






1901 




1 


4104 




Ca 


1905 




1 


4108 






1909 


1 


2 


4109 






1899 


1 


2 


4112 






1895 


1 


2 


4113 






1899 


1 


2 


4115 








1 


2 


4116 






1895 


1 




4117 






1897 


1 


2 


4120 






1909 


1 


2 


4122 






1896 


1 


2 


4121 






1909 


1 


2 


4124 






1896 


1 


2 


4125 






1896 


1 


2 


4127 






1899 


1 


2 


4128 






1897 


1 


2 


4129 






1897 


1 


2 


4132 






1906 


1 


2 


4133 






1907 




1 



OMB AgprtMM Ma 102440M 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



25 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



HERMITAGE (cont.) 












4134 






1906 




1 


4135 






1897 


1 


2 


4137 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4140 




Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


4141 






1902 




1 


4144 






1908 


1 


2 


4145 






1902 


1 


2 


4147 






1901 


1 


2 


4147 






1901 


1 


2 


4150 






1900 


1 


2 


4153- 


55 


Ca 


1920 




1 


4154- 


56 




1913 




1 


4200- 


06 




1910 


1 


2 


4208 






1910 


1 


2 


4210 




Ca 


1910 


1 


2 


4214 








1 




4216 






1923 


1 


2 


4217 




Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


4219 




Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


4220 






1898 


1 


2 


4222 






1898 


1 


2 


4223 






1894 


1 


2 


4224 






1896 




1 


4225- 


-27 




1948 


1 




4228 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4233- 


-39 




1929 




1 


4236 




Ca 


1900 




1 


4241- 


-47 




1923 




1 


4242 




Ca 


1890 


1 


2 


4250 






1898 




1 


4252 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4253 






1901 




1 


4257 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4300- 


-10 






1 


2 


4303 






1900 




1 


4307 




Ca 


1885 


1 


2 


4311 






1900 


1 


2 


4313 






1900 


1 


2 


4317 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4321- 


-23 




1894 


1 


2 



MMFwm IM0D4 



OU8 WM Wa 103WMH 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



26 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING -NON-CONTRIBUTING 



HERMITAGE (cont.) 
4322 






1912 


1 


2 


4324 






1914 


1 


2 


4325- 


29 




1928 




1 


4328- 


36 




1929 




1 


4331 






1908 


1 


2 


4333 






1908 


1 


2 


4335 




Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


4337 






1899 


1 


2 


4341 






1899 




1 


4342 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4343 






1899 




1 


4346 






1907 


1 


2 


4347 




Ca 


1890 


2 


3 


4349- 


51 




1905 




1 


4355- 


57 


Ca 


1905 




1 


4350 






1893 


1 


2 


4400 






1916 




1 


4417- 


07 


Ca 


1895 




1 


4402 




Ca 


1970 






4406 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4410- 


12 




1929 


1 


2 


4411 






1913 




1 


4415- 


19 


Ca 


1965 






4416 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4420 






1899 


1 


2 


4421- 


23 




1914 


1 


2 


4424 






1898 




1 


4427 








1 


2 


4428 






1906 


1 


2 


4431 






1900 


1 


2 


4432 






1898 


2 


3 


4436 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4437 




Ca 


1900 


1 




4438 




Ca 


1900 


1 


1 


4441 






1896 


1 


2 


4446 












4447 




Ca 


1895 


1 


2 


4450- 


-52 




1899 




1 


4454 






1910 




1 


4455 




Ca 


1970 







NP6 Form 10-W0-* 



Mo. 1O34-O01B 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



27 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



(cont. ) 












4500- 


06 




1923 




1 


4501- 


07 




1890 




1 


4510 






1897 


1 


2 


4511 






1921 




1 


4512 






1897 


1 


2 


4516 






1897 


1 


2 


4517 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4520- 


24 




1927 


1 


2 


4521 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4525 






1910 


1 


2 


4526 






1906 


1 


2 


4529 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4530 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4533 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4536 






1901 


1 


2 


4537 




Ca 


1895 


1 


2 


4538 






1902 


1 


2 


4542 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4546 












4600- 


02 




1929 




1 


4605 




Ca 


1890 


1 


2 


4606 






1927 




1 


4607 






1990 


1 




4609 






1990 


1 




4608- 


12 




1928 




1 


4615 






1897 


1 


2 


4616 






1900 




1 


4617 






1897 




1 


4620 






1900 


1 


2 


4621- 


-23 




1900 


2 


3 


4622 






1900 


1 


2 


4625 






1908 


1 


2 


4627 






1908 


1 


2 


4630 






1903 


1 


2 


4633- 


-37 










4634 






1924 


1 


2 


4636 








1 


2 


4641 






1948 


1 




4642 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4646 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 



QW AtVW Ho 101*4011 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



28 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE 



GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



HERMITAGE (cont.) 












4650- 


52 


Ca 


1910 


1 


2 


4651- 


53 


Ca 


1900 




1 


4655- 


57 


Ca 


1910 




1 


4707 




Ca 


1900 




1 


4712 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4713 




Ca 


1885 


1 


2 


4715- 


17 




1925 


1 


2 


4716 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4722 




Ca 


1900 




1 


4725 






1926 


1 


2 


4727 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4730- 


32 


Ca 


1970 






4731 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4734 






1901 


1 


2 


4735 








1 


2 


4737- 


39 




1928 




1 


4738 






1925 




1 


4740 






1924 


1 


2 


4743 










1 


4745 






1920 




1 


4746 






1920 


1 


2 


4747 






1925 


1 


2 


4750 






1924 


1 


2 


HUTCHINSON 1415- 


-17 




1920 




1 


1416- 


-24 




1925 




1 


14 21 






1909 


1 


2 


1425 






1910 


1 


2 


1426 






1908 


1 


2 


1427 






1924 


1 


2 


1423 






1913 


1 


2 


1431 






1915 


1 


2 


1432 






1903 


1 


2 


1433 




ca 


1915 


1 


2 


1434 






1915 


1 


2 


1437 






1904 


1 


2 


1438 






1906 


1 


2 


1439 






1910 


1 


2 


1440 




Ca 


1910 




1 



no. ro2*-ootj 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



29 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



HUTCHINSON (cont.) 










1443 




1913 


1 


2 


1444 




1904 


1 


2 


1445 




1906 


1 


2 


1448 




1910 


1 


2 


1447 


Ca 


1915 




1 


1450 




1911 


1 


2 


1451 




1906 


1 


2 


1454 




1906 


1 


2 


1455 




1908 


1 


2 


1456 




1904 




1 


1457 


ca 


1910 


1 


2 


1458 


Ca 


1910 


1 


2 


1461 




1913 




1 


1462 


Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


1463 




1909 




1 


1466 




1962 






1470 


Ca 


1915 


1 


2 


IRVING PARK 13 3 8-46 








1 


1400-02 




1907 




1 


1410-12 




1907 


2 


3 


1420-22 




1893 


1 


2 


1432 




1896 




1 


14 3 6 




1896 


1 


2 


1440-42 




1913 


1 


2 


1446 




1899 


1 


2 


1448-52 




1908 


2 


3 


1456 




1895 


2 


3 


1460-62 




1901 


1 


2 


1466-68 




1912 




1 


1476 








1 


1532 




1909 




1 


1612-14 




1923 




1 


1642-58 








1 


1700-14 




1922 




1 


1730 








1 


1736 






1 


2 


1742-58 




1319 




1 



NFS Form 1MC&4 



OMB *ppmv* No. TO2«0Ta 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



30 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



LAWRENCE 


1501-11 




1913 




1 




1601-09 


Ca 


1905 




1 




1611-15 












1619 




1904 


1 


2 




1625-29 




1915 




1 


LELAND 


1505-11 


Ca 


1930 




1 




1521 


Ca 


1900 




1 




1527 


Ca 


1900 


1 


2 




1531 


Ca 


1900 




1 




1533-35 




1895 




1 




1614-16 


Ca 


1900 


1 


1 




1620 




1902 




1 




1623-25 




1925 


1 


2 




1631-33 








1 




1705 




1924 


1 


2 




1713-15 




1893 




1 




1714-16 




1896 




1 




1719 


Ca 


1900 




1 




1720-22 


Ca 


1890 




1 




1721 


Ca 


1900 




1 




1726-32 




1905 




1 




1747-57 




1962 








1756-58 




1898 


1 


2 


MONTROSE 


1434 




1939 




1 




1436 




1894 




1 




1440 


Ca 


1905 




1 




1441-45 


Ca 


1920 




1 




1444 




1924 




1 




1447-51 


Ca 


1925 




1 




1448 








1 




1452-70 




1922 








1461-67 


Ca 


1895 




1 




1501-09 


Ca 


1980 








1510 




1906 




1 




1511 




1904 




1 




1514 




1906 




1 




1515 




1904 




1 



NPSFormiMOU 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Pago. 



31 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON- CONTRIBUTING 



MONTROSE (cont.) 
1518- 


30 




1916 




1 


1600- 


-10 




1917 




1 


1601- 


15 




1917 




1 


1612- 


28 




1925 




1 


1619- 


-25 










1627- 


-39 


Ca 


1920 




1 


1634- 


-38 








1 


1718 






1897 


1 


2 


1719- 


-23 


Ca 


1890 




1 


1754 




Ca 


1920 




1 


1756- 


■58 




1893 




1 


PAULINA 4 002- 


-12 




1932 




1 


4015 




Ca 


1908 


1 


2 


4017 




Ca 


1908 


1 


2 


4018 




Ca 


1908 


1 


2 


4022 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4023 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4026 




Ca 


1900 


1 




4027 






1900 


1 


2 


4028- 


-30 




1926 




1 


4031 








1 


2 


4037 






1905 


1 


2 


4040 






1980 


1 


1 


4041 






1909 


1 


2 


4043 






1909 


1 


2 


4044 






1960 






4046 






1909 


1 


2 


4047 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4050 






1894 




1 


4052 






1894 




1 


4054- 


-64 




1926 




1 


4101 






1902 


1 


2 


4105 






1902 


1 


2 


4106 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4107 






1902 




1 


4109 






1902 


1 


2 


4110 






1908 


1 


2 


4113 






1902 


1 


2 



OMS AfgltWtf NO. 102*00ta 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



32 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NONtCONTRIBUTING 



PAULINA (cont.) 












4114 






1908 


1 


2 


4115 






1911 


1 


2 


4116 






1906 


1 


2 


4117 






1907 


1 


2 


4120 






1910 


1 


2 


4123 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4124 






1911 


1 


2 


4126 






1918 


1 


2 


4127 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4130 




Ca 


1960 


1 




4133 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4136 






1895 


1 


2 


4137 






1896 


1 


2 


4140 






1907 


1 


2 


4141 






1911 




1 


4144 






1909 


1 


2 


4147 




ca 


1905 


2 


3 


4150 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4155 












4156 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4157 




Ca 


1900 




1 


4207- 


05 


Ca 


1965 






4211- 


23 




1927 




1 


4216 




Ca 


1915 


1 


2 


4220 






1917 


1 


2 


4225- 


33 




1928 




1 


4224 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4228 






1901 


1 


2 


4234 




Ca 


1895 


1 


2 


4237 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4238 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4241 






1908 




1 


4242- 


58 




1923 


1 


2 


4249 




Ca 


1885 


1 


2 


4251 




Ca 


1885 


2 


3 


4301 






1927 




1 


4307 




Ca 


1925 


1 


2 


4309- 


-13 


Ca 


1920 




1 


4317 




Ca 


1890 


1 


2 


4323 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



33 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE 



GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



PAULINA (cont.) 










4327 


Ca 


1960 


1 




4331 


Ca 


1895 


1 


2 


4333 


Ca 


1895 


1 


2 


4337 


Ca 


1895 


1 


2 


4339 


Ca 


1900 




1 


4324-48 




1912 




1 


4345 


Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4349 


Ca 


1900 




1 


4351 




1927 




1 


4355 




1893 




1 


4400-06 




1905 




1 


4401-13 


Ca 


1905 




1 


4410-14 


Ca 


1920 


2 


3 


4415 




1908 


1 


2 


4417 






1 


2 


4418 




1900 


1 


2 


4420 




1900 


1 


2 


4421-23 




1911 


1 


2 


4424 




1907 


1 


2 


4427 




1990 






4428 




1897 


1 


2 


4431-33 




1908 


1 


2 


4432 




1897 




1 


4435-37 




1908 


1 


2 


4436 




1898 


1 


2 


4444-56 




1917 




1 


4445-47 




1923 




1 


4451-57 




1905 




1 


4500-06 




1895 




1 


4501-09 








1 


4502-04 




1895 




1 


4507-09 


Ca 


1910 




1 


4510-18 


Ca 


1922 




1 


4513 




1897 


1 


2 


4517 




1907 


1 


2 


4519-27 




1925 




1 


4520-24 


Ca 


1970 






4530 




1988 


1 




4531-37 








1 


4532 




1988 


1 





NP8 Form 1O*0O* 



MO. lOW-OOJi 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



34 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



PAULINA (cont.) 








4534 




1988 


1 


4536 




1988 


1 


4540 




1988 


1 


4541 


Ca 


1900 




4542 




1988 


1 


4544 




1988 


1 


4545 




1897 




4546 




1988 


1 


4547 


Ca 


1900 


1 


4548 




1988 


1 


4550 




1988 


1 


4554 




1988 


1 


4555 


Ca 


1920 




4602-06 




1911 


1 


4601-07 




1926 




4613-19 




1925 




4610 




1910 


1 


4612-14 




1927 




4616-22 




1971 




4621-23 


Ca 


1960 




4624-28 




1971 




4625-27 


Ca 


1900 




4630 


Ca 


1900 


1 


4631 




1927 




4635-37 




1907 


2 


4636 




1903 


1 


4640 


Ca 


1960 




4641 




1928 




4644-46 


Ca 


1924 


1 


4645 




1896 




4648-50 


Ca 


1924 




4647 


Ca 


1890 




4651 




1898 


1 


4700-02 


Ca 


1889 


1 


4703 


Ca 


1900 




4706 




1912 




4707 


Ca 


1960 




4710-12 




1927 


1 


4711-13 




1915 


1 


4716 


Ca 


1915 


1 



DATE GARAGE C ONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 

2 
2 
2 



2 
2 

1 

2 

2 

2 
2 
2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

3 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 



MPSFwmlMOO* 



oue ivtuwrn no. icwflOH 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number 7 Page 35 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



PAULINA (cont.) 












4717 




Ca 


1900 




1 


4718 




Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


4721- 


23 


Ca 


1890 


1 


2 


4722 






1901 


1 


2 


4725- 


41 




1924 




1 


4726- 


28 




1924 


1 


2 


4732 




Ca 


1912 


1 


2 


4736 






1902 


1 


2 


4740 




Ca 


1900 




1 


4743 






1903 


1 


2 


4744- 


46 




1966 






4747 




Ca 


1905 


1 


2 


4750- 


52 


Ca 


1912 


2 


3 


4751- 


53 




1915 


1 


2 


4757- 


59 


Ca 


1915 




1 


PENSACOLA 14 3 3- 


35 




1946 






1436 






1927 




1 


1438 






1927 


1 


2 


1442 






1900 




1 


1443 






1900 




1 


1444 








1 


2 


14 4 5 






1902 


1 


2 


1448 






1900 


1 


2 


1449 






1902 


1 


2 


1451 








1 


2 


1452 






1902 


1 


2 


1454 






1901 


1 


2 


1453- 


-55 




1911 


1 


2 


1456 








1 


2 


1457 








1 


2 


1460 






1898 


1 


2 


1461 








1 


2 


1463 








1 


2 


1464 






1904 




1 


1468 










1 


1467- 


-69 




1921 


1 


2 



MS *fiwm no. ita*ant 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



36 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



RAVENSWOOD 4 001-07 




1914 


1 


4009-25 




1412/16 


1 


4039 




1914 


1 


4043 


Ca 


1922 


1 


4045-59 


Ca 


1920 


1 


4101-21 




1903/new 




4129 


Ca 


1911 


1 


4131-45 




1911 


1 


4147-49 


Ca 


1920 


1 


4201-19 




1910 


1 


4231-57 




1954/67 




4339-41 




1915 


1 


4311-13 




1921 


1 


4315-23 


Ca 


1925 


1 


4325-33 


ca 


1918 


1 


4335-43 




1909 


1 


4347-57 




1913 


1 


SOUTHPORT 4004-04 




1907 


1 


4001-09 




1915 


1 


4006 


Ca 


1915 


1 


4008 




1910 


1 


4013-35 




1915 


1 


4039 


Ca 


1920 


1 


4043-59 




1914 


1 


SUNNYSIDE 1453 


Ca 


1900 


1 


1455 


Ca 


1900 


1 


1457 




1905 


1 


1459 




1905 


1 


1463 




1901 


1 


1465 




1901 


1 


1500 




1904 


1 


1502 




1904 


1 


1506 




1904 


1 


1501-09 




1923 


1 


1508 




1904 


1 


1512 




1904 


1 


1513-15 




1895 


1 



NFS form 10400-a 



OMB AflfHW* No. 1O34-O01B 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page 37 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



7)ATE 



GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



SUNNYSIDE (cont.) 










1514 




1904 




1 


1518-22 


Ca 


1905 




1 


1519-21 


Ca 


1920 


1 


2 


1601-11 




1963 






1606-14 


Ca 


1924 




1 


1619-23 


Ca 


1905 




1 


1620 




1897 


1 


2 


1622 




1898 




1 


1625-33 




1905 




1 


1626 


Ca 


1900 




1 


1630-32 




1898 




1 


1700-10 




1895 




1 


1712-14 


Ca 


1895 




1 


1701-13 








1 


1724 




1970 


1 




1753 










1756-58 




1908 


1 


2 


1757-59 


Ca 


1910 






1763-65 










WARNER 14 00-02 


Ca 


1915 


1 


2 


1406-08 




1924 


1 


2 


1407 




1912 


1 


2 


1409 


Ca 


1912 


1 


2 


1412 




1899 




1 


1413 


Ca 


1912 


1 


2 


1415-19 




1895 


1 


2 


1416 


Ca 


1900 


1 


2 


1420 




1914 


1 


2 


1421-23 




1911 


1 


2 


1424 




1907 


1 


2 


1426-28 




1896 


1 


2 


1427-29 


Ca 


1920 


1 


2 


1430 




1914 




1 


1431 




1905 


1 


2 


1432 




1915 


1 


2 


1433 




1905 




1 


1434-36 




1916 


1 


2 


1437 




1909 




1 



Nf»S Fwn 1M0O4 



OUBAftmwl No. T02440IC 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number . 



Page. 



38 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



DATE 



GARAGE CONTRIBUTING NON-CONTRIBUTING 



WARNER 


(cont. ) 














1441 




Ca 


1895 


1 


2 




1445- 


47 




1916 




1 




1450 




Ca 


1900 




1 




1451 






1927 


1 


2 




1453 






1901 


1 


2 




1454 






1921 


1 


2 




1455 






1899 


1 


2 




1457 






1899 


1 


2 




1459 






1899 


1 


2 




1460- 


62 




1923 


1 


2 




1466- 


70 




1897 




1 


WILSON 


1443 
1447 
1449 
1453 
1455 






1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1900 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




1501 




Ca 


1895 




1 




1502 






1897 


1 


2 




1505 






1896 




1 




1506 






1897 


1 


2 




1508 






1897 


1 


2 




1509 






1896 




1 




1511 






1896 




1 




1512 






1897 


1 


2 




1514 






1897 




1 




1515 






1896 




1 




1518- 


-20 




1896 


2 


3 




1521 




1902/N.D. 




1 




1522 






1895 


1 


2 




1526 






1895 


1 


2 




1530- 


-32 




1902 




1 




1601- 


-15 


Ca 


1920 




1 




1600- 


-14 


Ca 


1918 




1 




1618- 


-32 


Ca 


1915 




1 




1619- 


-33 


Ca 


1920 




1 




1712- 


-14 


Ca 


1910 


1 


2 




1743 






1883 




1 




1742- 


-60 


Ca 


1920 








1759 






1938 




1 



8. Statement of Significance 



Certifying official has considered the significance of this property in relation to other properties: 

1 I nationally Q statewide 03 locally 

Applicable National Register Criteria [3* €Jb |T|C I ID 

Criteria Considerations (Exceptions) [I]A C^B Qc L]d C]e C^F I JG 



Areas of Significance (enter categories from instructions) 

Architecture 

Community Planning and Development 



Period of Significance 

1880-1940 



1880-1940 



Cultural Affiliation 

N/A 



Significant Person 

N/A 



Architect/Builder 

Cochran, John 
Crowen, Samuel 



Significant Dates 

N/A 



State significance of property, and justify criteria, criteria considerations, and areas and periods of significance noted above 
See continuation sheets 



1X3 See continuation sheet 



No. 102440ft 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 p age 2 

East Ravenswood Historic District 

SUMMARY 

The East Ravenswood Historic District, comprising the eastern 
portion of the area currently known as Ravenswood, is significant 
for both architecture and community planning as an early suburb of 
Chicago that represents in varied architectural styles and building 
types a city within a city. It is different from other Chicago 
historic districts in that it developed early into^ a self- 
contained residential community with commercial and industrial 
areas, in addition to many schools and churches that rendered _ it 
stable. With buildings ranging in dates from 1880 to 1940, its 
history is inextricably tied to that of Chicago from whence it 
derives its context. The district meets Criterion A, as it is 
associated with pivotal events and activities in Chicago and the 
midwest such as the development of transportation, the burgeoning 
growth following the Great Fire of 1871, the rapid influx of 
immigrants, the changes to the city caused by the World's Columbian 
Exposition of 1893, and the growth of industry in the late 
Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries. It also meets Criterion 
C in that its physical setting and building stock are 
representative of these transitions in the city's history. 
Through building types and styles, materials, setting, setbacks and 
scale are manifested the events and activities from which they 
sprang. The physical scale and character of the neighborhood have 
endured. 

HISTORY 

In 1909 Ravenswood was considered "Chicago's beauty spot" by a 
newspaper reporter who wrote: 

"With beautiful shade trees, green lawns, 
asphalt pavements and handsome homes, 
churches and schools, with unsurpassed 
transportation, Ravenswood is now conceded 
to be the choicest residence section of 
this great city. With fifteen years real 
estate valuations have nearly doubled. The 
growth has been rapid but healthy and 
permanent in character." 

As one of the oldest, if not the oldest suburb of the City of 
Chicago, Ravenswood was first a speculative subdivision. 
Development proceeded immediately and at a fairly rapid pace. It 



0U8 Appro** No. 10244)018 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 3 

East Ravenswood Historic District 

acquired early a clear identity, becoming an established, but 
distinct neighborhood of the city by the turn of the century, and 
a "city within a city" during the first quarter of the 20th 
century. Unlike most city neighborhoods, it sustained vitality 
through the war periods. It is primarily a residential community, 
but one containing a mix of retail, commercial, light industry and 
many institutions so that people can live, work and socialize in 
one place. The reasons for its development as a self-contained 
neighborhood arise from a study of the historic context from which 
it emerged, revealing much about how a community develops and what 
gives it the power to endure and remain vital. 

The stages of development in Ravenswood relate to a series of 
historical events and themes. After the establishment of the 
railroad, industry began to replace much of the truck farming along 
the Chicago River, and many of the German speaking immigrants who 
worked there sought a community near their work in which to raise 
their families. Further catalysts in Ravenswood 's development were 
the Chicago Fire of 1871, the additional rail and road growth of 
transportation networks and the resulting commerce. The character 
of the developing community was further shaped by its Swiss and 
German residents, who insisted on the building of many schools, 
churches, and other institutions, while prohibiting alcohol and 
pubs. These themes are strongly manifested in the neighborhood as 
it exists today. 

In I860 when Graceland Cemetery, five miles north _ of downtown 
Chicago, was chartered, the surrounding town of Lake View was still 
rural. Conrad Sulzer and his family had been the first settlers 
in what became known as Ravenswood in 1837, when he purchased 100 
acres of farmland. Sulzer was a Swiss immigrant, educated in 
horticulture and botany. Other settlers gradually moved out to the 
area and established farms around the Sulzer farmstead. 

The area was still sparsely populated in 1868, when the Ravenswood 
Land Company formed to develop the subdivision. The company was 
comorised of a group of southside (35th & the lake) businessmen who 
purchased the original 194 acre plot just to the north and west or 
Graceland Cemetery, contiguous to its northwest corner at Clark and 
Montrose. This plot was in direct contrast to the bustling city 
of Chicago, incorporated three decades earlier. The idea behind 
this speculation was to create a residential retreat outside the 
city in this pastoral setting. In Chicago, the flat treeless areas 



NPSForm 1 0*00-4 



DM6 Appnw* No. 1024-001» 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 4 

East Ravenswood Historic District 

were developed earliest because trees were difficult to clear fast 
enough for the burgeoning growth. Also the river location was of 
utmost importance for transportation and security reasons early on. 
The north shore with its wooded areas was saved for later 
development and proved perfect for bucolic residential suburbs. 
The area of Ravenswood was, in fact, the location of an evergreen 
forest known as Cedar Lawn, an early name for the area. Graceland 
Cemetery, on the eastern border, reinforced the suburban character 
of the area and was a neighborhood attraction with its beautiful 
landscaping and imposing monuments. 

Ravenswood was the first of numerous "pastoral suburban" 
speculative ventures. According to an 1869 issue of the Chicago 
Tribune , the development of Ravenswood showed "the desire on the 
part of the Chicago public to seek suburban residences. " Martin 
Van Allen, secretary of the Ravenswood Land Company, and his family 
were the first residents of the new suburb of Ravenswood. The Van 
Allen family had a home on the south side of Chicago, but in order 
to hold the title to the land, one member of the Land Company had 
to live on the property. Van Allen and his family agreed to be the 
ones to live in Ravenswood. 

There is speculation as to how the name Ravenswood was chosen for 
the development in 1863. It was first thought that the community 
was named after Chief Raven, an Indian who had lived along tne 
wooded region. An area near Ravenswood, called Bowmanville, had 
served as the home for Chicago area Indians after the government 
removed them from the lakefront in part of Lincoln Park and near 
the water works on Michigan Avenue. Another article speculates 
that it was named for the ravens which lived in the woods. Others 
claimed that the community was named after early settlers, Mr. 
Ravens and Mr. Woods. A popular theory is that is was the name of 
a town, in the East, once lived in by one of the developers. 
However, local historical Richard Bjorklund believes that the name 
was probably chosen from the character of "Ravenswood" in Sir 
Walter Scott's novel The Bride of Lammermoor . Though the true 
story is apparently buried with the early developers, the name has 
lived on. One measure of this is its current popularity as a line 
and stop of the elevated train. 

Transportation has always been an important theme in the unfolding 
history of Ravenswood. The Chicago and Northwestern was 
established through the area in 1855, which led to early business 



MPS' F«tn 10-MO* O^g , jp^rf «„ fOM40l« 

(*-M) 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 5 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



and industrial development. In 1869 when the subdivision was 
platted, only one person used the railroad to commute to Chicago 
for work. By 1874, 75 people commuted. According to one early 
journalist, three trains went each way, every day. The first train 
was called the Workers train, the second was referred as the Clerks 
train and the third train was called the Shirks and Shoppers train. 
These cars ran one-half to one-quarter of an hour apart. By 1910, 
there were steam cars, the elevated trains and a surface railroad, 
and these expanded means of transportation brought "as fine a class 
of people moving into Ravenswood as in any part of Chicago." He 
also compares Ravenswood to Buena Park, Edgewater and Rogers Park, 
and concludes that none could bypass Ravenswood in residences, and 
none could equal the community in transportation facilities. 

In 18 69 when Ravenswood was platted, the northern boundary of the 
city was Fullerton Avenue, 3 miles south of Ravenswood. Lakeview 
had been incorporated in 1865 as a city separate from Chicago. _ In 
1853 a group of businessmen had built Lakeview House, an early inn 
on the north shore just south of Irving Park Road. The purpose was 
to attract attention to the area as having potential for 
residential development. That led to a group funding the 
construction of a plank road called Evanston Avenue (now Broadway) 
to substantially improve access between Chicago and Irving Park 
Road, Evanston was an early settlement, dating from 1836. 
Gradually by 1870 numerous mansions were built along this road down 
to Diversey. 

The early settlers in what became Ravenswood were Swiss, Germans, 
Swedes and Luxembourgers , with German speaking people far out- 
numbering any others. These early settlers built homes and 
maintained truck farms on their land. The entire north side _ of 
what became Chicago was once truck farms, with celery being a major 
crop. More celery was shipped from Chicago in 1874 than from any 
other city. 

After the initial platting of Ravenswood, several additions were 
made soon thereafter. B.L. Touhy and Phillip Rogers, J. H. Kedzie 
and J. F. Keeney all made additions to Ravenswood in 1870. J.L. 
Stark made an addition in 1871. In 1872, the Clybourne addition 
became part of Ravenswood along with Frank Taylor's addition. This 
shows that development in the area did not slow down much even in 
the immediate shock from the fire. 



MPS Fomi 1M0O« q^S Apontr^ No. J02**»T» 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 p age 6 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



Little did the businessmen know that a major catastrophe in the 
city of Chicago would so affect the growth of their venture. The 
fire of 1871 served as a watershed for the expansion of Ravenswood. 
Hordes of people looked toward Ravenswood and the surrounding areas 
for a place to rebuild their homes and start their lives over 
again. The reason many chose Ravenswood after the fire was two- 
fold. First, many working-class people, unable to comply with the 
fireproof construction laws imposed by city government, sought an 
area where less expensive wood frame housing could be built. 
Wealthier people were motivated to move outside of Chicago by fear 
that another fire would occur. Both the working-class and middle- 
class Chicagoans found homes in Ravenswood. This diversity of 
economic backgrounds of early homeowners in Ravenswood is still 
evident as modest frame cottages coexist with grand frame, brick 
and stone houses throughout the district. 

The brickyards along the north branch of the Chicago River drew 
many German immigrants to the area in the 1870 's and 1880 's. The 
fireproof construction laws necessitated the manufacture of many 
bricks to rebuild the city of Chicago, and masons were needed to 
lay the brick. As more German-speaking immigrants came to Chicago, 
they also moved to the north side areas, and as it built up, the 
truck farms began to disappear. Further additions were made to 
Ravenswood. In 1874 L. Ingledew made an addition, and in 187 8 came 
the Park addition and the Thomas Lyman addition. There were also 
at this time many subdivisions of the previous plots. 

After the fire, the pressures of new population in the city 
combined with expanding transit facilities to encourage a rapid 
extension of Chicago's built-up area. This expansion took place 
most intensively along transportation lines that radiated from the 
business district. Ravenswood was part of this northern extension. 
Its most significant growth took place in the 1880 's and 1890' s. 
It was during this time that the streetcar lines, as well as a new 
service on the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul, increased the 
desirability of the community. With this population explosion, 
Ravenswood recognized the need for a more efficient sewage system 
than the existing system of open ditches. They also recognized the 
need for better support systems, and so annexed to Lakeview 
Township in 1887. Two years later, in anticipation of the 1893 
World's Columbian exposition, large outlying areas surrounding the 
city were annexed to make Chicago a larger metropolis. So in 1889 
Ravenswood, along with all of Lakeview, became part of the city. 



NP*F*rm 10400-a 



QMS Appci**) No. 102*4016 



United States Department of the interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 7 

East Ravenswood Historic District 

Changes were then very rapid. The annexation led to streetcar 
service on Montrose, new schools, the Ravenswood branchy of the 
elevated line, expected improvements in streets and sanitation, and 
the burgeoning of commerce and industry. 

COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY 

There were no stores or businesses in Ravenswood in the early years 
of its development. Residents had to depend on the grocery and 
meat wagons for food that they didn't grow, and shop in Chicago for 
other goods. In 1874, the first general store opened, and a 
business district developed on East and West Ravenswood avenues 
covering about two blocks around Wilson Avenue on either side of 
the railroad tracks. By 1900, Ravenswood Avenue was the "main 
street" of the community. This business district gave way to the 
development of the industrial corridor. The development proceeded 
in three waves; the first following the establishment of the 
Chicago and Northwestern in 1855, the second following the 
extension of the "El" into Ravenswood in 1901, and the third 
beginning with the close of World War I in 1918. 

The first wave served to identify the Railroad/Ravenswood Avenue 
corridor as commercial/light manufacturing. From the beginning, 
industry here was considered "inoffensive" and not detrimental to 
the residential community. The business/commercial center that 
grew up along the corridor in the latter part of the 19th century 
gave way to light manufacturing beginning in the 1890 's. The 
accessible transportation for goods, and the inexpensive land along 
the tracks facilitated this growth. There was also a ready labor 
pool present in the area due to two factors - Germans who had 
worked in the now- exhausted brickyards along the river, and 
displaced farm workers from the truck farms which were closing due 
to urbanization. Transportation advances were giving rise to farm 
competition from the West. The growth of these manufacturing 
plants led, in turn, to the development of more residential areas, 
thus promoting the cycle of development. 

More people brought increased transportation facilities, and in 
1907 the El was extended up along Ravenswood Avenue to a stop at 
Wilson Avenue. This led to a period of rapid expansion to the 
industrial corridor. At first, old stores were remodeled for 
factory use, and then as industries expanded, the old structures 



OMe ^«rM Na J02««0I» 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 8 

___ East Ravenswood Historic District 



were razed to make way for more modern factory facilities. There 
are 11 buildings extant in the historic district portion of the 
corridor representing the period of development from 1907-1918. 
Some of these are major early companies that undoubtably served to 
establish the corridor, such as Boye Needle Company, 1908; Hanz 
Engraving, 1914; Deagan; 1910; Pacific Flush Tank, 1915; and Union 
Linen Supply from 1911. Of these, Boye Needle Company and Union 
Linen Supply are still in at the same locations. 

Light manufacturing seems to have continued somewhat through World 
War I then picked up with renewed intensity at the close of the 
war. Along with a general business and residential boom, this led 
to the maturation of Ravenswood. The industrial boom was best 
expressed in 1922 by a "Made in Ravenswood" exposition that 
highlighted items manufactured in the neighborhood. An article 
about it in the Chicago Dailv News at the time reports. 

"Ravenswood is in fact a city within a city, 
and is preparing to demonstrate it. Within 
her borders are two major business districts 
and a half a dozen lesser ones and nearly 100 
factories employing thousands of 

workers Wallpaper, picture postcards, color 

plates, rebuilt typewriters, automatic 
pencils, needles, nameplates, scientific 
instruments, musical bells, packing, 
electrical supplies and radio equipment are 
among the principal products". 

Five industrial buildings representing this boom from 1918 through 
the mid-1920' s still exist in the district. These include Dartnell 
Publishing, 1920 and General Instrument Corporation, 1916/1923. 
Dartnell Publishing continues today in the same building. There 
are no buildings dating from the late 1920 's until after World War 
II, though apparently many of the existing companies stayed in 
business through those years. An excellent example of the 
regenerating development cycle of the neighborhood is expressed in 
this incident related from Chicago, the Great Central Market , in 
1923: 



OMB Appro** No. J02*O0TI 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 p a ge 9 

_____ East Ravenswood Historic District 



"High class factories are now occupying 
buildings along each side of the tracks and 
the number is increasing each year. At least 
one of these plants chose its present location 
as a result of a vote taken among the 
employees who were asked to decide where the 
new factory should be located. The votes 
showed that the majority favored Ravenswood 
and the directors of the corporation acted 
accordingly. This novel method of providing 
for the contentment of employees, who are able 
to walk to their work from their pleasant 
homes, is working out well. Factories are now 
plentiful all the way from Clybourn station to 
Ravenswood, about three and one-half miles." 

Three of the major companies, from different development phases, 
shed further light on this aspect of Ravenswood 's history. The 
Boye Needle Company, originally founded in 1905 by John L. 
Flannery, was located on Wabash Avenue between Randolph and 
Washington Streets. That building was destroyed by fire in 19 08, 
and a year later the company relocated to a new building at 4335 
North Ravenswood. This is a three story building of masonry and 
reinforced concrete, in a simple design with some corbeled and 
decorative brick. By 1918, they employed 150 people in the 
manufacture of sewing machine supplies, hardware and dry goods 
novelties. They also occupied an adjacent building dating from 
1913, where they continue business today. The original building 
is nearly intact, while the 1913 building had some windows bricked 
in. 

Manz Engraving was founded by Jacob Manz, a wood engraver, in 1867. 
They also originally occupied a building in the loop, which was 
destroyed by the fire of 1871. They moved to Ravenswood in 1908, 
occupying the existing building at 4001 North Ravenswood in 1914. 
The company is credited with introducing the zinc process and the 
system of making halftones to the engraving industry. By 1922, 
they employed 500-600 people. The building is a handsome, dark 
brick structure of four floors with an imposing tower rising above. 



UPS Form IMOTm Qua Approve No. 102440IB 

(Me) 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 10 

East Ravenswood Historic District 

The Deagan Unicut building, another handsome structure, of five 
stories with an imposing tower, was built in 1910 at 4201 
Ravenswood to house J.C. Deagan, Inc. This architecturally 
significant structure is of red brick with classical detailing in 
limestone and terra cotta. Deagan manufactured musical instruments 
for bands, musical bells and the "Una-fon" musical keyboard that 
was used in skating rinks, theatres and the Ringling Brothers 
Circus. They also made tower, clock and cathedral chimes. In fact, 
Chicago at this time led the world in the production of musical 
instruments. 

Virtually all of the buildings in the industrial corridor are still 
in use in a light manufacturing or business manner. This 
collection of buildings as a whole illustrates an important part 
of Ravenswood 's history. While not designed by famous architects, 
the buildings present a living laboratory of both the development 
of an industrial corridor, and the design of light industrial 
buildings from 1909-1925 in a primarily German neighborhood of the 
American midwest. The particularly fine masonry work and the use 
of brick to articulate openings, piers, cornices and other building 
features is typical of the German masons who lives and worked in 
this area. 

During the 1890" s another small business center developed in 
Ravenswood at the intersection of Irving Park, Lincoln and Damen. 
This area came to be known as North Center and is the name still 
used for that part of Ravenswood. While that center is not in the 
historic district, the commercial area grew east along Irving Park 
to Clark Street within the district, and has continued as 
commercial. 

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT 

From 1869 when the subdivision was platted, Ravenswood was intended 
to be an area of fine single family homes, a neighborhood of beauty 
and tradition, upholding family values. By 187 0, large homes on 
estate acreage were scattered along the lakefront from what^ is now 
Uptown down to Diversey. The early suburban developers, 3ust as 
now, designed their developments as "mini-estates", taking their 
inspiration from these pre-existing landscaped estates. The sites 
were subdivided into 50' lots. Though none of the earliest houses 



HPSFwrn 1M0O* 



QMS JpprovM MO. 102«0U 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 p a ge 11 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



or mansions have survived, initially they helped to establish the 
refined residential character of the north side. 

The existing single family residences provide excellent examples 
of the stylistic evolution of late 19th and early 20th century 
domestic vernacular architecture. They range from primarily 1880 
to 1920. The earlier homes from the 1880's such as 4307 N. 
Hermitage, are variations on the farmhouse upright and wing, with 
Italianate details. These early urban houses all have gables 
perpendicular to the street. The simplest from this era are 
versions of the Chicago cottage, with proportions similar to Greek 
Revival homes, with various types of ornamentation tacked on. From 
these simpler forms, the styles evolve to those of Queen Anne or 
Victorian influence. The popular success of Queen Anne in America 
dated from the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition of 1876 where the 
English pavilions were enthusiastically received. By 1876, Queen 
Anne design had moved into a phase called "free classic" a more 
exuberant interpretation combining elements from many revival 
styles. These forces all combine to create the ubiquitous Queen 
Anne found not only in cities throughout the U.S., but in suburbs 
and the countryside as well, through the turn of the 20th century. 
In feeling, it presented a renewed interest in the Picturesque, 
while evoking a period of the past that was just distant enough to 
appear rosy in the eyes of an /America that had lost so much 
confidence in the future during the financial panic of 1873. The 
most dominant features of the Queen Anne, irregularity of massing 
and plan and variety of texture and colors, appear in all the 
Ravenswood examples of this style. One "transitional" home, 4234 
N. Paulina, combines the simpler upright and wing form with the 
elaborate porches, bay windows, trim, and irregular additions of 
the Queen Ann style. The Queen Annes come in all shapes and sizes, 
from frame cottages, such as the ones at 4647 and 4323 N. Paulina, 
to 2 1/2 story greystones, such as 1529 W. Lawrence. Typical are 
the wood frame irregularly massed 2 1/2 story with a tower, such 
as 4722 N. Paulina and 4223 N. Hermitage. One of the finest is the 
Abbot House and lab at 4605 N. Hermitage, home of the Abbot family 
and location of the first Abbot laboratory. These homes date from 
the late 1890' s and the turn-of-the-century. The legacy of the 
1893 World's Columbian Exposition was renewed interest in the 
Classical, which left an indelible print on Chicago architecture 
for many years. It filtered down to residential buildings as a 
return to simpler forms, and the application of classical detail 
to extant forms. 



NPS Form 1O40&4 



<MB *&*W* Ho Wa4401i 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 12 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



The depression of the 1890 's led to housing reform, the rise of 
the Arts and Crafts movement, and new household technology that 
revolutionized concepts of comfort, convenience and order. 
Architecturally, this expressed itself as simpler forms and less 
decoration, more inexpensive homes, the aesthetic of sparseness, 
and a return to symmetry. Also during this time, elements of Frank 
Lloyd Wright's Prairie School design had begun to turn up in 
suburban homes. The early 20th century saw the rise of the Four 
Square and bungalow type house, with new "modern" kitchens. In 
Ravenswood, an excellent example of a Four Square is 4651 N. 
Paulina, dating from the turn of the century, and featuring a 
wraparound classically detailed porch. From about 15 years later 
at 1700 W. Wilson is a stuccoed Prairie Square. Single family 
homes during the inter-war period in Ravenswood, as in suburbs 
across America, most often took the form of bungalows. First 
flourishing in California, the bungalow tended to carry many of the 
tenants of the Art and Crafts esthetic with it. Sets of working 
drawings for bungalows could be bought for little money. A row of 
wonderful bungalows can be found in Ravenswood in the 4200 block 
of Greenview, along with a Spanish style house. The best example 
of a Prairie style house is at 1470 Hutchinson, at the corner of 
Greenview. 

The multi-family buildings in Ravenswood are of several types - the 
most common being the 2 flat and the 6 flat. These date from the 
1890 's and continued to be built until the late 1920' s. The early 
two flats are often difficult to discern from single family homes. 
The early six flats also were designed to resemble large homes. 
The architectural development of multi-family dwellings in Chicago, 
generally, is that of incorporating elements of suburban single 
family home architecture. Chicagoans, with traditional values of 
home and family, were not quick to accept "flats" as a healthy way 
of life. However, their expedience in a rapidly expanding urban 
area was not to be denied. By building them to resemble single 
family homes, a shared architectural vocabulary evolved that 
provided an important continuity between disparate building types. 
In Ravenswood, single family homes are intermingled with 2 and 3 
flats, 6 flats and even courtyard apartment building on the same 
streets. Yet all presents visual harmony. Cuyler Street, for 
example, is a blend of 2 and 3 flats, 6 flats and small single 
family homes that date from 1895 to 1928. They are built of frame, 
brick, and stone with many types of stylistic details. This short 



NP8 Form 10-8OO-* 



QMS Approval No. )024-Xl- 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 13 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



street is, in fact, a textbook of the evolution of these building 
types. At the east end of the street, two 3 flats from 1895 face 
each other across the street, one stone and one frame. Both could 
easily be mistaken for single family homes. Other three flats on 
the street date from 1905, 1911 and 1926. The 2 flats, of which 
there are a dozen, range from 1897 to 1928. Nine 6 flats were 
built between 1897 and 1920. The forms of these buildings remain 
much the same through the years, with details varying. From the 
late 1880 's they tend to display Victorian details, though the 
irregular massing, roof lines and complicated porches were not 
economical on these speculative buildings. Simple symmetrical 
lines and classical detailing much more effectively lent themselves 
to multi-unit structures. In an attempt to create symmetry along 
with efficiency of plan, two and three flats were often built in 
pairs, as mirror images of each other. There are many examples of 
these pairs throughout the historic district. In the case of four 
and six flats, the pairs were actually joined together. Virtually 
all of the four and six flats are of this symmetrical type until 
the 1920 's, when rampant eclecticism allowed for tacking on many 
different types of design details, from Tudor to Renaissance and 
even more exotic. From 1900 to 1915, the Classical vocabulary 
reigned, giving way to the simpler arts and crafts styles with the 
ubiquitous sun porch. Every multi-family building in the district 
from 1915 to 1922 features enclosed sun porches. This era, and on 
through the 1920's, also produced a visual riot in brick designs. 
Until the turn-of-the-century , brick produced by Chicago's 
brickyards, was uniformly red and flat textured. As the technology 
here became more sophisticated and designers of buildings demanded 
more choice, the manufacturer began to produce bricks varied in 
size, color and texture. As the designs of buildings became 
simpler, the variety reflected in bricks became more apparent. No 
buildings from 1915 through the 1920's use a flat textured red 
brick. In addition to the qualities of the brick itself, in the 
hands of the skilled German masons of the north side, many 
beautiful designs were created by mixing brick of different colors 
and textures. 

Small apartment buildings could easily adapt to the form of single 
family buildings, with amenities such as sun porches and a single 
grand entrance. But larger apartment buildings presented problems. 
One earlier way of handling this was to situate the apartment 
building on a corner, forming an L shape with open space at the 
rear. The earliest larger apartment building in Ravenswood is of 



0MB Ape/Ml No. 1024-OO1I 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 14 r * n j u • * • n ■ * ■ * 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



this type, the Lincolnwood Courts building at 2500 N. Paulina. It 
was built by R. J. Bennett and designed by architect Morrison Vail 
in 1895. It is a three story building of greystone on the first 
floor and brown brick above, combining elements of Classical 
Revival and Queen Anne. The design is dominated by an octagonal 
corner tower capped with an octagonal roof. A highly decorative 
and unusual cornice is formed with contrasting brickwork in a 
diamond pattern. On the first floor, the stone is rusticated _ in 
a Renaissance fashion and the entrances are of classical design 
with pediments and Ionic columns. 

The landscaped courtyard, which first came into being around the 
turn of the century, became the best means of incorporating light 
air and open space into the larger apartment building. Thus the 
buildings could maintain the feel, as well as scale, of other 
neighborhood buildings. The biggest problem in designing large 
apartment buildings had been how to provide light and air to all 
apartments in a way that was also not a fire trap or a conduit for 
noise and pollution. The landscaped courtyard eliminated these 
problems, provided a green space visible from each apartment and 
offered greater privacy with separate entrances for a few 
apartments each. 

The courtyard buildings in Ravenswood are all three stories on a 
raised basement, and most date from the 1920's. Like many such 
buildings, the fronts facing the courtyard present an undulating 
facade of bays or swells that break the flat surface. The earliest 
courtyard building, at 4400-06 Paulina, is the most unusual in the 
district. Built in 1905, its form is simple, with plain straight 
lines, and evenly spaced windows in a symmetrical facade. In 
detail, it is Prairie School influenced, with wide eaves above a 
curved large stucco cornice featuring brick Prairie style patterned 
medallions. Below the top row of windows, a belt course further 
emphasizes the horizontal lines of the design. The round arched 
entry door has a transom with a Prairie style motif _ and is covered 
by a decorative stone pent. This building was designed and built 
by architect Samuel N. Crowen, a native of Germany. He worked in 
some of the larger Chicago architectural offices, including Solon 
Beman, and in 1897 went solo. He designed many apartment buildings 
on the north side of Chicago, including several in Sheridan Park. 
From 1910-30 he designed commercial and industrial buildings also, 
including Willoughby Towers on Michigan Avenue and the A.B. Dick 



OMB Approval No. 1024401) 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 15 

^^____ East Ravenswood Historic District 



Factory building. In 1925 he established S.N. Crowen & Associates, 
where he continued to work until his death in 1935. 

In the 1920 's, not all apartment buildings over 6 units were court- 
yards or half courtyards. There continued to be corridor type 
buildings, usually with highly decorative, eclectic facades evoking 
middle eastern or some exotic design. These were usually designed 
in a T shape, with the long sides of the building drawn in to allow 
light and air, though not much of a view. This was a style adapted 
by many of the apartment hotels and kitchenette apartments of the 
late 1920's and 1930's. Ravenswood has always been a mixed socio- 
economic community, which contained homes of many sizes, from 
sumptuous single family homes and large apartments to average sized 
and efficiency apartments. Since the exterior designs of all these 
types of buildings share similarities in size and scale, materials 
and architectural detailing, they all blend together well in the 
streetscape. One fine example of a corridor type apartment 
building is 4222 N. Ashland, built in 1929, and designed by Raymond 
Gregori. It is cream colored brick with terra cotta trim, and 
emoloys a Middle Eastern motif. The top floor windows feature ogee 
arches, and a tiled, low hipped roof completes the design. Raymond 
Gregori, a Chicago architect for 50 years, was known as the "master 
of the common corridor" building, designing them throughout the 
city. 

SCHOOLS AND CHURCHES 

Education and religion were a primary concern to the settlers of 
Ravenswood. The quality and number of churches and schools kept 
people in the community and attracted others to the area. The 
Ravenswood Land Company played an integral role in the formation 
of these institutions. The Land company offered a free lot at 
Montrose and Hermitage to any congregation who would erect an 
edifice carrying no indebtedness. The Presbyterian Church, to whom 
it was offered, failed to meet the qualification, as did the 
Episcopalians who were next in line. The Methodists refused the 
offer and then finally the Congregational Church succeeded in 
meeting the specific conditions. They secured the lot, and built 
the first church in Ravenswood in 18 69. It was then the only 
Protestant church in Lakeview Township. 



0M8 Afiprov* No 10244X119 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 8 Page 16 

_^ East Ravenswood Historic District 



Various newspaper articles have referred to Ravenswood as a "City 
of Churches" because there has always been so many religious groups 
represented. The extant churches are excellent examples of 
ecclesiastical architecture ranging in dates from 1883 to 1923 and 
in styles from Victorian to Gothic, Revival, Baroque and 
Neoclassical. All Saints Episcopal Church, dating from 1883, is 
the earliest extant church but was the third church organized in 
Ravenswood. Located at the southwest corner of Hermitage and 
Wilson, it is a frame building of stucco and wood built in the 
Queen Anne stick style popular at the time for residences. With 
its steep gabled roof lines and half timbering with stucco, it 
displays both residential scale and detailing. The distinctive 
bell tower dramatically sets the building off. Perhaps the oldest 
frame church still in use in Chicago, it was designated a Chicago 
Landmark in 1982. It was designed by John Cochrane, one of 
Illinois' best known architects, who designed the Illinois State- 
house in Springfield in 1869. His specialty was public buildings 
of all types, as he also designed the first Board of Trade in 
Chicago, the Cook County Hospital and Michael Reese Hospital, as 
well as other churches. 



=cond church to be organized in Ravenswood was the Ravenswood 
3ist Episcopal Church, in 1872-73. The building built at that 



The sec 

Methodi__ -r ,,. — - . . 

time was moved to the northeast corner of Hermitage and Sunnyside, 
where a new structure was built in 1890. It is a heavy stone 
structure of Richardsonian Romanesque design, very popular at the 
time for institutional buildings. It has a very decorative wood 
interior. While Ravenswood' s first church at Montrose and 
Hermitage was subsequently destroyed, a new church was built there 
just before the turn-of-the-century . Built of brick and stucco in 
a Victorian Gothic design, it features wide bracketed eaves and 
Gothic windows, with wood trim. 

In 1913 was built an unusual Spanish Baroque church at the 
southeast corner of Ashland and Leland. Designed by architects 
Worthman and Steinbach, Our Lady of Lourdes is an exuberant example 
of ecclesiastical architecture in yellow brick with stone, copper 
and tile detailing. It features twin towers and a dome with a 
cooper lantern over the crossing. In 1929, the entire edifice was 
moved across the street to the southwest corner. Several years 
later, in 1917, yet another unusual and stylistically divergent 
church was built in Ravenswood, the Fourteenth Church of Christ 
Scientist at Paulina and Sunnyside. It was designed by the firm 



0M8 Aflproval Ho TO244OT0 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number 8 Page 17 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



of Dumming and Jensen in the Classical Revival style. With low 
cross gables, the gable facing the street forms a pedimented 
portico supported by columns. This church was also built of yellow 
brick with terra cotta ornament. 

Each of these churches represents a distinctive style of its time, 
well crafted and situated only blocks from each other, illustrating 
the commitment of a community to both its institutions and the 
quality of their design. 

The Ravenswood Land Company also showed its commitment to 
education, constructing the first school in Ravenswood at its own 
expense in 1869. This was a one room frame schoolhouse on the 
corner of Hermitage and Wilson Avenues. It was known as the Sulzer 
school, and was replaced by the Ravenswood School at the corner of 
Montrose and Paulina in 1873, a result of a $75,000 bond issue 
approved in 1872 creating the Ravenswood School District. This was 
remodeled in 1887 and subsequently replaced by the new Ravenswood 
School in 1892-93. This original part of the now expanded building 
was built of red brick with limestone trim, in a clean, classical 
design. It is three stories tall, with unusual carved stone trim. 
It was added to in 1916 with two story wings that are very 
horizontal in feel, with low hipped roof lines and detailing 
suggestive of Prairie School design. 

The first high school for Lakeview Township was erected in 
Ravenswood at Irving Park Boulevard and Ashland Avenue in 1874. 
This was, in fact, the first township high school in Illinois. The 
site for the building was given to the community by the Graceland 
Cemetery Company, with the condition that the land be forever used 
as a school site. The first building burned in 1884, and the 
present Lakeview Township High School was built on the same 
location in 1885. It has since been added on to greatly, but its 
grand arched entrance, crenelated towers and steep pitched gables 
lend it a collegiate stateliness worthy of a university campus. 

At this time, Ravenswood was the educational and religious center 
for the territory between the lake and the river, Belmont and Rose 
Hill. It had developed as such, and kept its reputation by 
continued interest in all aspects of cultural life that rendered 
it much more than a bedroom community from the beginning. It was 
strengthened and stabilized by these institutions. 



NTS Form 1MI»4 OMB H**W* Ho. (Q24O0U 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

ox- 8 18 

Section number Page . . . . . . 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



RELATED DISTRICTS 

Ravenswood can be compared to a number of other large mixed 
districts in early outlying subdivided areas of the city, such as 
Lakeview, Buena Park and Sheridan Park. These were all part of the 
burgeoning growth of the city north along the lakefront and 
included fine residences from the 19th and early 2 0th centuries. 

The Lakeview historic district, much of which was built around the 
same time as Ravenswood, nevertheless was conceived as urban and 
remained so. It contains virtually no frame structures, being 
comprised mostly of masonry row houses with later apartment 
buildings. Buena Park is a strictly residential area, with the few 
commercial buildings seen as intrusions. It developed later than 
Ravenswood, as a natural result of the filling in of the lakefront 
from development pressures. It does represent excellent examples 
of the transition of residential building types and styles. 
Sheridan Park has similarities to Buena Park, developing _ a bit 
later still but also representing a residential transition of 
styles. It is quite homogenous in scale, with excellent examples 
of apartment buildings. These districts, like Lakeview, are 
primarily of masonry construction. 

Ravenswood is set apart by its early beginnings and subsequent 
development as a suburban community. Rather than a collection of 
residential buildings as urban neighborhoods, it was conceived to 
be an escape from the city, with the large frame homes bearing more 
resemblance to small towns and more historical reference to country 
estates. As it grew from its early days, it kept its suburban 
residential areas, strengthening its institutions and adding its 
own business and industry, all of which became intrinsic parts of 
Ravenswood as it has always been known. 



No. 1024-OQIt 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 9 Paga 2 . _. . . + 
a East Ravenswood Historic District 



Bibliography 

Andreas, A.T. History of Cook County . Chicago: A.T. Andreas 
Co., 1884. 

Bjorklund, Richard. Pioneer Settler Conrad Sulzer . Chicago: 
Ravenswood - Lakeview Historical Association, ca. 1986. 

Bjorkland, Richard. Chicago, Illinois. Interview, 7 October, 
1986. 

Chamberlain, Everett. Chicago and Its Suburbs . Chicago: T.A. 
Hunger ford & Co., 1874. 

Chicago Association of Commerce. Hap of Chicago and Suburbs . 
Chicago, 1909. 

Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry. Chicago, the Great 
Central Market . Chicago: R.L. Polk & Co., 1923. 

Chicago Department of Development and Planning. Historic City: 
The settlement of Chicago . Chicago: City of Chicago, 1976. 

Chicago Department of Public Works. Map of Chicago Showing 
Growth of the City by Annexations . Chicago, 1922, 1924, 
1935, 1940. 

Chicago Plan Commission. Housing in Chicago Communities . 
Chicago: WPA, 1940. 

Commission on Chicago Landmarks. Chicago Historic Resources 
Survey, 47th Ward, 1985. 

DeWit, We. "Apartment Houses and Bungalows: Building the Flat 
City ." Chicago History . 7 (Winter 1983-84). 

Drury, John. Old Chicago Houses . Chicago: University of 
Chicago Press, 1941. 

Drury, John. "Pioneer Days of Lakeview Ends When Annexed to 

Chicago in 1889." Landlord's Guide . 38 (May 1947): P. 4-7. 



NFSFomlMK* OMfl A/**** No. 1(0*0011 

(MS) 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section numhar 9 Page 3 . 

a East Ravenswood Historic District 



"Dual Charms Boost Ravenswood to Fore," Chicago Daily News , 20 
Kay, 1922. 

"History of Ravenswood Community, Chicago," unpublished documents 
prepared by research committee, University of Chicago, 
various dates. 

Kerfoot, Samuel H. " History of Lake View ," ms. at Chicago 
Historical Society, ca. 1895. 

"Lake View." Daily News , 8 July 1929. 

Lane, George A. Chicago Churches & Synagogues . Chicago: Loyola 
Univ. Press, 1981. 

Mayer, Harold M. , and Wade, Richard C. Chicago: Growth of a 

Metropolis . Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1969. 

"Our Suburbs." Chicago Times . 10 Oct. 1369. 

The Ravenswood News . 19 20 May 1931, 12 May 1937. 

Ravenswood One of the First Subdivisions. Chicago Tribune, 
6 Oct. 1929. 

"Romance of Ravenswood." North Shore News , 28 March, 1930. 

Zatterberg, Helen. An Historical Ske t ch of Ravenswood and Lake 
View . Chicago: Ravenswood-Lake View Historical Association, 
1941. 



M#8 Form 1 HU« OWB Appro**/ «o HB4430IB 

United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 10 Page 1 J ,,. ^ . „.„..«. 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



VERBAL BOUNDARY DESCRIPTION 

The East Ravenswood Historic District is situated within the city 
limits of Chicago, about six miles north of the loop business 
district. Beginning at a point approximately one hundred feel west 
of the western edge of Southport Street even with the eastern 
boundary of 1338 Irving Park at the centerline of Irving Park road 
proceed east along the centerline of Ashland Avenue. Go north 
approximately 165 feet to the southern boundary of 4010 North 
Ashland and proceed west to the east boundary of 1612 Irving Park 
Road, then south to the centerline of Irving Park Rd. Proceed west 
to the centerline of the alley on the east boundary of 1614 Irving 
Park, then north approximately 185 feet to the southern boundary 
of 4015 Paulina and follow that west to the centerline of Paulina 
Street and then south to the centerline of Irving Park Rd. Proceed 
west on Irving Park Road to the centerline of East Ravenswood and 
then north on East Ravenswood to the centerline of Montrose. 
Proceed East on Montrose approximately 210 feet to the centerline 
of the alley behind 4401 East Ravenswood, then north on the 
centerline of the alley to a point approximately 37 feet south of 
the southern boundary of Sunnyside. Proceed west along the 
southern boundary of 1763 Sunnyside approximately 75 feet to that 
property's eastern boundary, then north to the centerline of 
Sunnyside and west to the centerline of the alley behind 4500 North 
Ravenswood. From that point proceed north on the centerline of the 
alley to a point approximately 65 feet south of the southern 
boundary of Lawrence Avenue. Proceed west along the northern 
boundary of 4750 Hermitage and continue west across Hermitage 
following the northern boundaries of the property at 4751 
Hermitage, west across the alley and following the northern 
boundary of 4752 Paulina to the centerline of Paulina. From that 
point proceed north approximately 100 feet to the centerline of 
Lawrence Avenue and west along the centerline to the centerline of 
Ashland. Proceed south along Ashland to the centerline of Leland 
and then east along the centerline of Leland to a point even with 
the east boundary of the property at 1505 Leland. Proceed south 
along that boundary approximately 75 feet to the southern boundary 
of 1505-11 Leland, then west along that boundary to the centerline 
of Greenview. Proceed south approximately 55 feet to a point even 
with the southern boundary of 1521 Leland, and then west along the 
southern boundaries of the properties at 1521-35 Leland to the west 
boundary of 1535 Leland. Proceed south following the eastern 
boundaries of the properties at 4643-15 Ashland approximately 350 



QMS Hprvm Ha. 102440TS 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 

Section number 1Q_ Page — 3 — j «(„„,•, m.^ivt 

East Ravenswood Historic District 



feet to the centerline of the alley at the rear of 1518 Wilson, 
then proceed east along the centerline of the alley to a point even 
with the eastern boundary of 1502 Wilson. Proceed south along that 
boundary to the centerline of Wilson, then east along the 
centerline of Wilson to the centerline of Clark. Proceed south 
along the centerline of Clark to the centerline of Sunnyside, then 
west along the centerline of Sunnyside to the centerline of the 
alley behind 4456 Clark and south along the centerline of the alley 
to a point even with the southern boundary of 4450-56 Clark. 
Proceed east along this boundary to the centerline of Clark, then 
southeast along the centerline of Clark to the centerline of 
Montrose, and west along the centerline of Montrose to a point even 
with the western boundary of 14 3 9 Montrose. Proceed south along 
this boundary approximately 160 feet to centerline of the alley at 
the south of 1439 Montrose, then east along the centerline of the 
alley to the centerline of Clark. Proceed southeast along the 
centerline of Clark to the centerline of Southport, then south 
along the centerline of Southport to the centerline of Warner and 
west along the centerline of Southport to a point even with the 
western boundary of 1401 Warner. Proceed south along this boundary 
to the centerline of the alley at the rear of 1401 Warner, then 
east along the centerline of the alley to the centerline of 
Southport. Proceed south along the centerline of Southport to the 
centerline of Belle Plaine, then northeast along the centerline of 
Belle Plaine approximately 125 feet to a point even with the 
eastern boundary of 4057 Southport. Proceed south along the 
eastern boundaries of the properties at 4001-4057 Southport to the 
centerline of Irving Park Road. 

BOUNDARY JUSTIFICATION 

The East Ravenswood Historic District is a cohesive collection of 
late 19th and early 20th century history properties that represents 
the development of an early suburb of Chicago into a self-contained 
neighborhood of the city. The north portion of the district, from 
Montrose to Lawrence, comprises most of the original 1868 sub- 
division plot. The southern portion, from Montrose to Irving Park, 
is comprised mostly of early additions. The original and early 
subdivision maps were used as a base, and compared with the 
existing building stock as it represents historic themes. A review 
of integrity, condition of buildings and visual cohesion determined 
the final boundaries. East Ravenswood Street was chosen as the 



OMB tfipnnt Ho. IMWOH 



United States Department of the Interior 

National Park Service 

National Register of Historic Places 
Continuation Sheet 



Section number 10 Page . 



East Ravenswood Historic District 



western boundary since the area to the east is generally older and 
more significant, and retains better integrity. To the west, 
visual cohesion and integrity drop off. 



UTM References 
E 444630 4646070 

E N 
G 444790 4645930 

E N 
I 444170 4644720 

E N 
j 444160 4645520 

E N 
L 444220 4646250 

E N 



F 444630 4645990 

E N 
H 445020 4644720 

E N 
j 444160 4645520 

E N 
K 444230 4645520 

E N 
M 444410 4646310 

E N 



9. Major Bibliographical References 



See continuation sheets 



Previous documentation on tile (NPS): 

□ preliminary determination of Individual listing (38 CFR 67) 
has been requested 

previously listed In the National Register 
previously determined eligible by the National Register 
designated a National Historic Landmark 
recorded by Historic American Buildings 

Survey # . 

□ recorded by Historic American Engineering 

Record # 



10. Geographical Data 



QSee continuation sheet 

Primary location of additional data: 

□ State historic preservation office 

□ Other Stats agency 

□ Federal agency 
|T Local government 
I I University 

□ other 
Specify repository: 



Acreage of property Approximately 247 



UTM References . 

A UjJ I4l4,4l5,5i0l I4,6l4,6l3,l,i0| 

Zone Easting Northing 

C ILl6J I4|4,4|7,2,0| |4,6|4,6|1,2,0| 



Verbal Boundary Description 



B| l, 61 1414,415,5,01 I4,6I4,6|1,2,0| 

Zone Easting Northing 

o il, 61 I4l4,4|7,2,0| |4,6|4,6[0,7,0| 

Q3 See continuation sheet 



Boundary Justification 



CT See continuation sheet 



11. Form Prepared By 

name/title Susan Baldwin 



3 See continuation sheet 



Consultant 



organization Continental Inv pstment Group 

street & number 2800 N. T.akp. Shore Drive. #2604 
city or town Chicago _ 



rtntr Sppr ornK °r 1 1990 

t6leph ° n ° .n:: v1 - n ™L. bub^y 



. State T1 linnis 



zip code . 



* U S GPO: 1 98B-0-223-91 6 



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EAST RAVEKSV-OOD HISTOHIC DI£TRIC-i 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

SOUTHERN HALF 







nn ' 



ZAST RAVEKSKOOD HISTORIC DISTRICT 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

NORTHERN HAL? 



ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY . Paschal I HQU 

ARKANSAS, WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

County MPS) 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY. Roper HOUSe . Hi 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY. Searcy Ci ly Hal 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

County MPS) 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

County MPS) 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY. Van Met 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS, WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY. WatKins 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY. Woodson . Daltpn 

ARKANSAS. WHITE COUNTY. 

ARKANSAS, WHITE COUNTY 



jet. of n. Oak and e. center sts.. searcy. 9/05/91. 91001203 (whi te county mps) 
Patroan House , jet . of Mountain and jackson Sts., pangburn. 9/05/91. 91001292 (white county MPS) 
Pemberton House . 601 n. Cypress St.. Beebe, 9/05/91. 91001255 (white County MPS) 
Powel I clothing store , 201 n. Main St.. Beebe. 9/05/91. 91001249 (white County MPS) 
Rober tson House , jct.of 2nd and Dandr i dge sts.. Kensett. 9/05/91. 91001221 (whi te county MPS) 
Rodgers. Porter, sr . . House , jet, of n. Oak and E. Race sts.. Searcy. 9/05/91. 91001230 (white 

Street. MCRae . 9/05/91. 91001346 (white county MPS) 

jet. of cum and Race sts.. searcy, 9/05/91. 91001227 (white county MPS) 
sel lers House . 702 w. center St.. Beebe. 9/05/91, 91001261 (whi te county mps) 
shue House . 108 Holly St.. Beebe. 9/05/91, 91001257 (white county MPS) 
Shutter, lohn. House , jet. of Austin and Main sts., pangburn. 9/05/91. 91001299 (whit' 
smi th House . 607 w. Arch Ave., searcy, 9/05/91. 9100121s (white county mps) 
smi th, a. i. . House , ar 385. cr i f f i thvi I ie. 9/05/91. 91001223 (whi te county MPS) 
Snipes, pr. Emroett, House , jet. of E. Market and N. locust Sts.. searcy. 9/05/9 



county mps) 



91001243 (whi te 



Staqqs — Huf faker Bui Idinq , Jet. of n. Main and w. 
Ti tus House. 406 



i noi s St s . . Beebe . 



9/05/91 . 91001250 (Whi 



;. Center St.. Searcy. 9/05/91, 91001240 (white County MPS) 

House , jet. of wade and 14th sts., (udsonia. 9/05/91. 91001233 (white County MPS) 
ward--stout House . jet. of Front and walnut sts.. Bradford. 9/05/91. 91001313 (white county mps) 
watkins House . 1208 e. Race St.. searcy. 9/05/91. 91001182 (white county mps) 

Tom, House , jet . of Oak and Race Sts.. Searcy. 9/05/91. 91001183 (whi te county MPS) 
Weber House . Elm St., Russell. 9/05/91. 91001272 (white county mps) 
wi Iburn House . 707 E. Race St.. searcy. 9/05/91, 91001177 (white County mps) 
woodson. Arthur w., House . 1005 w, ArchAve.. Searcy, 9/05/91, 91001211 (whi te County mps) 
House . 1007 w. Arch Ave., searcy, 9/05/91. 91001212 (white county mps) 
ght , Avanel l , House , jet. of Main and Pine sts., pangburn, 9/05/91. 91001291 (white county mps) 
Mm, Farmstead Hi stor ic Pi str ict . AR 258 E of jet. with ar 323. Bald Knob vicinity, 9/05/91, 



idad Head, Tr inidad 
ito 



wr iqht 
91001284 (white county mps) 

CALIFORNIA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY , Trinidad Head Light station 
stations of California mps) 

California, marin county. Point Bon i t a Light station . Point Bonita. sausa 
cal i forn i a mps) 

California, marin county. Point Reyes Light station . Point Reyes National seashore. Point Reyes 
(Light stations of California MPS) 

California, mendocino county. Point cabrillo Light station , 45300 Lighthouse Rd . . Caspar 
stations of California mps) 

California, monterey county, point sur Light Stat i on . Morro Rock on Point sur 
91001097 (Light stations of California mps) 

California, san franc isco county. Yerba Buena island Lighthouse . Yerba Buena island 
91001096 (Light stations of California MPS) 
California, san luis OBISPO county, Piedras Blancas Light station , ca 1 on Point Piedras Blancas san Simeon vicinity 
9/03/91. 91001095 (Light stations of California mps) 

California, san luis OBISPO county. San mis Obispo Light station , point san Luis, 
(Light stations of California MPS) 
California, san mateo ccunty , point Montara Light stat ion , jct.,of 16th St. and ca 



cinity. 9/03/91. 91001098 (Light 
9/03/91. 91001099 (Light stations of 

icinity. 9/03/91, 91001100 

Cinity, 9/03/91, 91001092 (Light 

sur vicini ty. 9/03/91 . 



. 5 mi . 



' of ca 1 . 



San Franc i sco 



9/03/91 



la Beach 



Mon t a r a 



rtity 

ity. 



9/03/91 
9/03/91 . 



91001 175 

and Bond E of 



Jong s. Fork Broad R., watso 



(Light stations of California mps) 

California, ventura county. Anacapa island Light station . Anacapa island. Channel islands National Park oxnard 

9/03/91. 91001101 (Light stations of California MPS) 

Connecticut, new london county. Lamb Homestead . 47 Lambtown Rd . , Ledyard. 9/03/91. 

FLORIDA. JEFFERSON COUNTY. Lloyd Histor ic District . Roughly, Main St. N of Bond St. 

91001374 

GEORGIA. OGLETHORPE COUNTY, Watson Mi 1 I covered Bridge and Mill Historic District . 

Park, comer vicinity, 9/05/91. 91001147 

Illinois, COOK COUNTY, East Ravenswood Historic District . Roughly bounded by Lawrence Ave., Clark St.. Irving park Rd. and 

Ravenswood St.. Chicago. 9/03/91. 91001364 

IOWA, henry county. Budde--Si nger 8ui Idinq . 1 10 N. . Main. , Mount Pleasant. 9/06/91. 91001112 (Mount Pleasant MPS) 

iowa. henry county, city Ha 1 1 . 220 w. Monroe. Mount Pleasant. 9/06/91, 91001120 (Mount Pleasant MPS) 

iowa. henry county. First Nat ional sank . 101 s. Jefferson, Mount Pleasant. 9/06/91, 91001118 (Mount Pleasant mps) 

iowa. henry county. Henry county Savings Bank . 100 s. Main, Mount pleasant, 9/06/91, 91001116 (Mount Pleasant MPS) 

iowa. henry county. Loui sa Bui Idinq . 120 s. Main, Mount Pleasant. 9/06/91. 91001117 (Mount Pleasant mps) 

iowa. henry county. Masonic Temple Theater . 115 n. Main. Mount Pleasant, 9/06/91. 91001119 (Mount pleasant mps) 

iowa. henry county, Mas ters Bui Idinq . 221 w. Monroe, Mount Pleasant, 9/06/91. 91001121 (Mount Pleasant mps) 

iowa, henry county. Mccandless Bui Idinq . 115 w. Monroe, Mount Pleasant. 9/06/91, 91001m (Mount Pleasant MPS) 

iowa. henry county. Nat ional state Bank . 101 w. Monroe. Mount Pleasant. 9/06/91, 91001115 (Mount Pleasant MPS) 

IOWA, henry county, Timmertnan--Burd Building . 118 s. Main. Mount Pleasant, 9/06/91, 91001 1 13 (Mount Pleasant MPS) 

iowa, henry county, union Block . 109—113 w. Monroe, Mount Pleasant. 9/06/91. 91001110 (Mount Pleasant mps) 

iowa. henry county, zuhn Bu i I d i nq . 201 E. Monroe, Mount pleasant. 9/06/91, 91001114 (Mount Pleasant mps) 

Kansas, rooks county. Thomas Barn , ne of woodston. near Osborne co. line, woodston vicinity, 9/06/91. 91001104 

Massachusetts. ESSEX county. Nahant civic Historic District , 332 and 334 Nahant Rd . and 15 Pleasant St.. Nahant 9/03/91 

91001 174 

Missouri. ST. LOuis independent city. Fulton Bag company Building . 612--6I8 s. seventh St. 

9/05/91 . 



Iding . 

1001372 

Montana, ravalli county. Fi rst Bapt ist church . 402 Church, stevensv 



LOUI 



{ Independent Ci ty) , 



9/03/91. 91000737 ( s t evensv i I le mps)